Buy cheap renova online

The Australian government will continue shouldering the SMS cost buy cheap renova online renova investments for e-prescriptions until 30 June 2022.WHY IT MATTERSSubsidies are specifically provided for costs related to the issuance of e-prescription tokens. SMS costs are incurred each time a prescriber writes an e-prescription and sends a token to a patient's mobile phone.The subsidy extension comes after prodding by the Australian Medical Association, which has been calling on the Health Department and the Australian Digital Health Agency to develop long-term solutions to avoid passing those costs onto prescribers.Earlier, the provision of subsidies was supposed to lapse at the end of March but was extended until 30 June.THE LARGER TRENDThere are buy cheap renova online other means for prescribers to issue digital prescriptions without incurring costs, such as the Active Script List system. Among providers, Fred IT introduced in May its My Script List solution that combines a patient's e-prescriptions in one digital list, removing the need for prescription tokens. According to the AMA, the Health Department and ADHA are also working on a mobile app that will enable GPs to send scripts to patients without the need buy cheap renova online for tokens.Australia launched e-prescriptions in May last year.

While there is no government mandate to issue them, the ADHA found that e-prescription issuance has topped 12 million as of June this year. The agency said there are over 22,000 prescribers in the country issuing digital prescriptions and at least 98% of all community pharmacies are dispensing them.ON THE RECORD"Now that the Active buy cheap renova online Script List is expanding in its availability to consumers across Australia, more health professionals and consumers will also be able to use this token management solution that will not incur the SMS charges. Innovations across the digital landscape will offer other alternatives as more digital health initiatives become a reality over time," the AMA said in a news update to its member GPs..

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A continuum of socioeconomic status ranging from the least to the most privileged persons is evidenced in population studies, with profound implications for health and care.1 Individuals in the most disadvantaged social group suffer from extreme poverty and face several specific challenges to their health and healthcare.2 They frequently cannot meet their most basic needs (including their physiological needs, most acutely exemplified by homelessness) and are at a higher risk of health problems and accelerated ageing due to unhealthy habits (eg, unhealthy diet and drug consumption), harmful environmental and biological factors and social isolation.1–4 As a result, the most socially disadvantaged persons have higher rates of premature mortality, especially caused by suicide and violence, and higher prevalence of all types of diseases, renova zero flavor particularly infectious diseases and mental disorders.2 5 Besides, care for chronic conditions is compromised for this population group, which relies to a substantial degree in emergency care, particularly in health systems that do not guarantee universal health coverage.5Even considering the relative size of the most deprived extreme of the social continuum (eg, about 0.5% of the UK adult population Ventolin expectorant price in 2018 was considered homeless),6 the scale of ….

A continuum of socioeconomic status ranging from the least to the most privileged persons is evidenced in population studies, with profound implications for health and care.1 Individuals in the most disadvantaged social group suffer from extreme poverty and face several specific challenges to their health and healthcare.2 They frequently cannot meet their most basic needs (including their physiological needs, most acutely exemplified by homelessness) and are at a higher risk of health problems and accelerated ageing buy cheap renova online due to unhealthy habits (eg, unhealthy diet and drug consumption), harmful environmental and biological factors and social isolation.1–4 As a result, the most socially disadvantaged persons have higher rates of premature mortality, especially caused by suicide and violence, and higher prevalence of all types of diseases, particularly infectious diseases and mental disorders.2 5 Besides, care for chronic conditions is compromised for this population group, which relies to a substantial degree in emergency care, particularly in health systems that do not guarantee universal health coverage.5Even considering the relative size of the most deprived extreme of the social continuum (eg, about 0.5% of the UK adult population in 2018 was considered homeless),6 the scale of ….

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Just before the release in June of the much-anticipated Pentagon report on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP), I sat down to try to create a list of the schneider electric renova greatest hurdles to UAPs' scientific analysis. What I came up with were five major challenges that are described here, together with a cross-comparison with some of the statements made in the published government report. Although only nine pages long, that report turns out to be thorough, careful and scientifically accurate in that it fully expresses how little certainty can be drawn from the data to hand. As the saying goes schneider electric renova.

The more things change, the more they stay the same. Challenge No. 1. All UAP/UFO incidents are nonrepeatable.

We can’t go back and perform the “experiment” of that exact observation again. For science in general, this kind of thing is a big headache. A lack of repeatability or replication poses a very significant challenge for the interpretation of data (especially if those data are noisy and incomplete). For filling in obvious gaps.

And for eliminating or supporting any hypotheses. As the Pentagon report states. €œLimited data leaves most UAP unexplained….” Limited, anecdotal and nonrepeatable are hardly the words you want to use, but they apply here. Challenge No.

2. There is nothing systematic in how incidents are recorded or reported. Different camera systems, radar systems, data processing, observers and environmental circumstances mean that each incident is, in effect, an uncontrolled experiment, with few ways to ascertain the real quality and sensitivity of data. Again, the Pentagon report states effectively the same point.

€œThe limited amount of high-quality reporting on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) hampers our ability to draw firm conclusions about the nature or intent of UAP.” The report then goes on to suggest a potentially useful task of. €œConsistent consolidation of reports from across the federal government, standardized reporting, increased collection and analysis, and a streamlined process for screening.” This is really important. The report is very, very specific about the lack of appropriateness of typical military sensor equipment for this sort of analysis. €œThe sensors mounted on U.S.

Military platforms are typically designed to fulfill specific missions. As a result, those sensors are not generally suited for identifying UAP.” Challenge No. 3. There is no easy way to account for “cherry-picking” of data.

We don’t know how often pilots or other observers see something unexpected but then, a minute later, figure out what they’re witnessing (or at least convince themselves they’ve done so) and consequently don’t report anything. There could be thousands of such incidents, or very few. We don’t know, and those “mundane” cases could actually represent all cases. The report does discuss the “stigma” surrounding personnel or observers reporting UAPs, but it also states that out of the 144 reports that were studied, only 18 incidents (covered in 21 of the reports) appeared to demonstrate “advanced technology,” inasmuch as there was an appearance of unusual aeronautical behavior in movement.

In a small (unspecified) number of cases there was even evidence of military aircraft systems “processing radio frequency (RF) energy”—whatever that really means. Presumably there was some increased radio noise. But, as for all the times that nothing was reported, either because something was quickly identified, or a pilot just chose not to, that remains a total unknown. Challenge No.

4. If any incidents or observations are genuinely associated with something tangible and physical, we don’t know whether we’re looking at a single underlying phenomenon or many. It’s a bit like going into a zoo blindfolded and trying to understand what you’re hearing and smelling. If there’s only one species you might figure it out, but if there are 100 species, then decoding your experience is going to be very difficult.

Again, the report hits this nail right on the head, with an entire section titled “UAP probably lack a single explanation.” Some of the possibilities offered are. €œAirborne clutter … birds, balloons, recreational unmanned aerial vehicles … debris like plastic bags … that muddle a scene,” as well as natural atmospheric phenomena (ice crystals, thermal fluctuations that can register on infrared and radar systems), classified aircraft and the like, and foreign “adversary systems.” The Pentagon report also provides an outline of ongoing efforts, and possible future directions, for trying to improve all analyses. This includes a more systematic collection of military aircraft sensor data, along with FAA data, and applying machine learning to sift through current and historical information to look for “clusters,” patterns and associations with known phenomena like weather balloons, wildlife movements and other Earth-monitoring databases. Challenge No.

5. The popular association of UAP with hypotheses involving alien technology creates a severe analysis bias. Usually, science tries to move stepwise towards finding support for a given hypothesis or for eliminating hypotheses, and weighs those options as evenly as possible. But in this case a hypothesis that would require extraordinarily robust evidence in order to be supported (as with Carl Sagan’s famous dictum “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence”), regardless of what some people say, hangs heavily over any analysis or discussion, and there is a vocal community who feel that the answer is already known.

That’s a problem. In fact, and rather ironically, the “sociocultural stigmas” around recording surprising observations mentioned in the report are undoubtedly exacerbated by elements of the UFO community that express ideas or beliefs that are, well, fantastical in nature. Consequently, observers such as highly trained, professional pilots are likely going to be reticent to mention things they are very surprised by. This relates to point No.

3 and creates bias because the unreported incidents, if further analyzed, could provide significant insight—especially as to how often human observers are simply confused, as opposed to witnessing genuinely unusual phenomena. Where does all of this leave us?. Well, the Pentagon report does suggest ways to improve data collection and analysis, as I’ve described. It also points out that if some UAP do represent physical hazards, or security challenges, it would be important to figure that out.

In that sense, there is some possible risk mitigation to be had by investigating UAP further, irrespective of an eventually mundane or extraordinary explanation. As a scientist who studies the possibilities of life elsewhere in the cosmos, I find myself saying “Well, it seems worth having some more work done on this.” But that’s not because I think it’s likely that extraterrestrials or their probes could be dropping into Earth’s atmosphere. Although as a rational thinker I can’t, and shouldn’t, permanently exclude such possibilities, my point No. 5 bothers me enough that I’d rather follow the stepwise approach.

There are other benefits to that strategy too. In particular, I think that the idea of a vastly more systematic collection of data (from things like state-of-the-art camera systems placed on aircraft or in monitoring locations) would be an interesting activity regardless of what is actually taking place in our skies. New kinds of high-resolution time-lapse data and high-fidelity monitoring of our planetary environment could have many additional benefits as we try to navigate our way through a perilously changing world. From atmospherics to animal migration to human-generated garbage floating in the air and on the sea, seeing what’s actually going on is always going to help.

This is an opinion and analysis article. The views expressed by the author or authors are not necessarily those of Scientific American.For the past two weeks, much of the world has watched, transfixed, as Olympic gymnasts flip, leap and vault for the gold. Under the glare of the spotlight, a lifetime of practice and physical mastery has come to fruition as these athletes perform superhuman tricks the average human could never fathom executing. But outside the stadiums of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, a different kind of acrobatic feat is performed every day.

Both closer to the Olympics, in the forests of Japan, and in treetops all around the world, squirrels leap meters through the air to get from branch to branch. The stakes are different in this natural arena. The squirrels scurry around to find morsels of food, all the while trying to evade occasional airborne predators such as hawks. But the speed and ease with which they navigate the challenging and unpredictable canopy environment is “spectacular,” says University of California, Berkeley, biomechanics researcher Robert Full.

The animals easily land leaps several times the length of their body. And we do not really know how they do it, Full says. €œHow do they know that they have the capability in their body to achieve those jumps?. € he asks.

The coordination between a squirrel’s body and mind is not just a curiosity for human observers, Full explains. The well-executed moves could influence the design of smarter robots, incorporating some of the squirrels’ best physical traits. Their flexible spine, grippy paws and grabby claws. And squirrels are not just daredevil acrobats.

They are adept learners, too. €œThey have really good memories,” says Gregory Byrnes, who studies biomechanics at Siena College in Loudonville, N.Y. A squirrel you see scampering through the park has likely followed that same path before and mapped the route out in its brain, Byrnes says. And when the weather turns cold in the winter, the diligent rodents recall and retrieve the many caches of nuts they have stashed all over their territory.

It is this squirreling away that differentiates them from other arboreal animals, such as some primates, says Nathaniel Hunt, who studies biomechanics at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Pair that learning ability with a responsive, flexible body, and you’ve got the makings of an extraordinary robot, he says. Hunt and his colleagues wanted to evaluate three aspects of squirrels’ skills. Their decision-making, learning and capacity for innovation.

To capture the capabilities of free-ranging animals, the researchers decided to test these qualities in wild fox squirrels in an outdoor setup in the woods near U.C. Berkeley. First they had to get the wild squirrels to actually participate in experiments— not an easy task with such wily animals. €œThere were some squirrels that would get distracted and just decide, ‘It’s time to take a nap,’” Hunt says.

Luckily, most of the subjects understood what to do after they had a few tries and received several reward peanuts. As any gardener with a bird feeder will tell you, “they’re very food-motivated,” Hunt says. The researchers put the squirrels through an outdoor obstacle course and tracked their leaps with high-speed video. In one task, they coaxed the subjects to jump across gaps of different distances from branchlike wooden rods that behaved like diving boards.

The ledges bent easily under the squirrels’ weight, depending on how far the animals stood from the “tree trunk.” This situation forced them to make a decision. Should they jump from the end of a branch to shorten the distance but risk an unstable bend when that branch is compliant?. Or should they stay closer to the “trunk” when they launch but risk the longer jump?. The squirrels were six times more sensitive to the bendiness of the branch than to the distance of the jump, the researchers report in a paper published today in Science.

€œThey’re much more influenced by the amount the branch is going to flex rather than the distance they have to leap across,” Hunt says of the squirrels. In their little brain, there might be an element of self-confidence at play. The squirrels are much surer of their own jumping ability than they are that the bending branch underneath them will not snap and fall, Hunt postulates. When the scientists altered the flexibility of the branch or the distance to leap, the squirrels quickly adjusted their technique to match the changes, learning within just a few tries to alter the velocity of their launch.

But the real fun started when the team placed the “branches” against a vertical wall to extend the leap distance even farther. Surprisingly, instead of merely jumping between ledges, the squirrels bounded and pushed off the wall in a wide array of parkourlike moves, which the researchers quantified and cataloged. The squirrels used a wall to establish an additional point of contact to make midair adjustments, either further propelling themselves forward or braking to slow down as they careened off the vertical surface, Hunt says. €œOne thing that really surprised me was the extent to which they would use any kind of structure they could reach,” he says.

The scientists were not expecting the squirrels to use the wall to their advantage or to refine their parkour techniques over subsequent trails, Full explains. €œThey innovated right in front of our eyes!. € he says. None of the squirrels fell in any of the trials.

Some did not land on the target surface with perfect finesse. They might swing under or keel over the platform, for example. But the animals made the landing every time. €œThis is really cool,” says Byrnes, who was not involved with the research.

€œIt’s a great quantification of these things that animals do but which we don’t know how to describe.” Byrnes says he is curious to learn about the deeper mechanics of the leaps to see what the limbs are doing and how much energy a squirrel loses with different types of jumps. The work by Hunt and Full’s team is part of a larger, multi-institutional collaboration to study and apply the principles of squirrel locomotion. In addition to creating robots that can make similar moves, researchers are studying what exactly happens in a squirrel’s brain as it makes these split-second leaps and how the act of making these jumps develops over time as a baby squirrel grows up. Though the animals are ubiquitous, Full says, we are just starting to understand and appreciate how they scamper through the treetops.

€œThey make great choices, and they’re very creative,” he adds. €œThey’re extraordinary.”President Biden is set to announce twin policies today aimed at slashing car emissions and accelerating widespread electric vehicle adoption in an effort to tackle climate change and out-compete Chinese manufacturers, according to senior administration officials. The long-awaited moves will usher in one of the nation’s strongest-ever climate regulations and target 50% of all vehicles sold by 2030 to be electric. Administration officials lauded the plan as a “paradigm shift.” Some climate experts, however, said the policies fall short of what is needed to stave off catastrophic warming, and critics described Biden’s efforts as incomparable to the stronger actions of Europe and other countries.

The first prong of the administration’s plan aims to restore former President Obama’s greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles, which were rolled back by former President Trump. The proposed rule, which is jointly set by EPA and a division within the Transportation Department, would incrementally ratchet up fuel efficiency requirements through model year 2026. The president will also sign an executive order tomorrow, flanked by auto industry officials and union representatives, setting a target by which half of all car sales would be electric models within nine years. Eligible vehicles include electric, plug-in hybrid, and battery and fuel cell EVs.

The order will also direct federal agencies to begin drafting fuel efficiency standards for cars made after 2026. Those new tailpipe rules will be crucial to meeting Biden’s goal of achieving net-zero emissions by 2050, experts said. Transportation is the country’s largest source of greenhouse gases, and cars account for the bulk of that carbon pollution. General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co.

And Stellantis NV, the company formerly known as Fiat Chrysler, praised Biden’s plan to sign the executive order, but stopped short of offering a firm commitment to hit the 50% EV target. The companies said they have a “shared aspiration to achieve sales of 40-50% of annual U.S. Volumes of electric vehicles.” “Our recent product, technology, and investment announcements highlight our collective commitment to be leaders in the U.S. Transition to electric vehicles,” the companies said in a joint statement.

Under Obama, auto companies were required to raise fuel economy 5% each year through 2026. But Trump reduced that rate to 1.5% annually. Trump also repealed California’s legal authority to set its own standards, which the Biden administration is working to restore. In 2019, five car companies—Ford, BMW, Honda Motor Co.

Ltd., Volkswagen AG and Volvo—broke with competitors and reached a deal with California to increase miles per gallon by 3.7% a year. Biden’s proposed rule would apply the California framework for model year 2023 and increase mileage standards to 5% in 2025 and at least 5% in 2026. Paul Bledsoe, a strategic adviser for the Progressive Policy Institute, said the proposed rule is “aggressive.” “But more broadly, the administration is trying to provide market incentives for the automakers to switch their fleets toward electric vehicles,” said Bledsoe, who served as a Department of Energy consultant under Obama and worked on climate change in the Clinton administration. €œRegulations are just a backstop to what should be an attempt to transform the entire industry through consumer demand and technological progress.” But Dan Sperling, a member of the California Air Resources Board, said the standards aren’t strong enough to motivate car companies to scale up their sales of EVs.

€œThis is a sideshow to the transition to electric vehicles,” he said. €œOther countries have far more stringent standards and far more aggressive commitments to EVs, and that includes Europe and China.” The European Union has proposed banning the sale of gasoline engines by 2035, which is a necessary step to stave off catastrophic warming, according to an International Energy Agency report released earlier this year (Climatewire, May 18). California and Massachusetts have also committed to ending the sale of gas-powered vehicles by 2035, and at least 11 other states are considering it. €œThe administration is going to make this announcement as if this is some big sign of climate progress,” said Holly Burke, communications director for Evergreen Action.

Under current federal policy, a Rhodium Group analysis forecasts that EV sales would reach 11% to 19% of new car purchases by 2026. By 2031, Rhodium found that EVs would be on track to reach 27% to 39% of new car purchases. €œAnd what’s frustrating is that [the benchmarks are] way below where they need to be—and way less ambitious than it seems like they easily could be,” Burke said. Biden has made EVs a cornerstone of his climate agenda.

But he’s offered few hard promises about how he wants to reshape transportation. He campaigned on specific targets for environmental justice, the electricity sector, buildings and reaching net-zero emissions across the entire economy. In office, he’s set even stronger benchmarks for nationwide decarbonization. But his transportation goals remain harder to pin down—which is the opposite of how it should be, environmentalists say.

The president has more power over transportation emissions than almost any other sector. €œOf the things Biden could do on climate through his existing executive authority, cars are one of the places he could move the needle the most,” Burke said. Biden’s car rulemaking coincides with trouble for his EV agenda in Congress. Biden promised to build 500,000 EV charging stations, but the White House started downplaying that commitment after money was cut from the bipartisan infrastructure deal.

The spending package is expected to provide $7.5 billion for EV chargers. That’s half of what the administration had planned for, though some officials think it’s still enough to hit Biden’s charger goal. Reprinted from E&E News with permission from POLITICO, LLC. Copyright 2021.

E&E News provides essential news for energy and environment professionals.Comparing the relative sizes of bird species has long seemed an impossible task—too many species simply lack reliable counts. A recent influx of citizen science data, however, allowed researchers to make global abundance estimates for 9,700 species, about 92 percent of all birds on Earth. Biologists Corey T. Callaghan, Shinichi Nakagawa and William K.

Cornwell, all at the University of New South Wales in Australia, combined scientific data for 724 well-studied species with counts from the app eBird, where people around the world can submit bird sightings. The researchers used an algorithm to extrapolate estimates for all species in their sample. The results, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, confirm a common pattern among animals. Across the globe there are many species with small populations isolated in niche habitats and relatively few species that have managed to expand over a wide territory and grow their population into the hundreds of millions or billions.

Eventually the findings could help with conservation efforts. €œThe next step is, Which species are rare because that's just the way Mother Nature made them, and which species are rare because we [humans] screwed up?. € Callaghan asks. This project did not try to answer these questions, but it is a “necessary first step” toward doing so, he says.

Challenge No buy cheap renova online. 1. All UAP/UFO incidents are nonrepeatable. We can’t go buy cheap renova online back and perform the “experiment” of that exact observation again. For science in general, this kind of thing is a big headache.

A lack of repeatability or replication poses a very significant challenge for the interpretation of data (especially if those data are noisy and incomplete). For filling in obvious buy cheap renova online gaps. And for eliminating or supporting any hypotheses. As the Pentagon report states. €œLimited data leaves most UAP unexplained….” Limited, anecdotal and nonrepeatable are buy cheap renova online hardly the words you want to use, but they apply here.

Challenge No. 2. There is nothing systematic in how buy cheap renova online incidents are recorded or reported. Different camera systems, radar systems, data processing, observers and environmental circumstances mean that each incident is, in effect, an uncontrolled experiment, with few ways to ascertain the real quality and sensitivity of data. Again, the Pentagon report states effectively the same point.

€œThe limited amount of high-quality reporting on unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) buy cheap renova online hampers our ability to draw firm conclusions about the nature or intent of UAP.” The report then goes on to suggest a potentially useful task of. €œConsistent consolidation of reports from across the federal government, standardized reporting, increased collection and analysis, and a streamlined process for screening.” This is really important. The report is very, very specific about the lack of appropriateness of typical military sensor equipment for this sort of analysis. €œThe sensors mounted on U.S buy cheap renova online. Military platforms are typically designed to fulfill specific missions.

As a result, those sensors are not generally suited for identifying UAP.” Challenge No. 3. There is no easy way to account for “cherry-picking” of data. We don’t know how often pilots or other observers see something unexpected but then, a minute later, figure out what they’re witnessing (or at least convince themselves they’ve done so) and consequently don’t report anything. There could be thousands of such incidents, or very few.

We don’t know, and those “mundane” cases could actually represent all cases. The report does discuss the “stigma” surrounding personnel or observers reporting UAPs, but it also states that out of the 144 reports that were studied, only 18 incidents (covered in 21 of the reports) appeared to demonstrate “advanced technology,” inasmuch as there was an appearance of unusual aeronautical behavior in movement. In a small (unspecified) number of cases there was even evidence of military aircraft systems “processing radio frequency (RF) energy”—whatever that really means. Presumably there was some increased radio noise. But, as for all the times that nothing was reported, either because something was quickly identified, or a pilot just chose not to, that remains a total unknown.

Challenge No. 4. If any incidents or observations are genuinely associated with something tangible and physical, we don’t know whether we’re looking at a single underlying phenomenon or many. It’s a bit like going into a zoo blindfolded and trying to understand what you’re hearing and smelling. If there’s only one species you might figure it out, but if there are 100 species, then decoding your experience is going to be very difficult.

Again, the report hits this nail right on the head, with an entire section titled “UAP probably lack a single explanation.” Some of the possibilities offered are. €œAirborne clutter … birds, balloons, recreational unmanned aerial vehicles … debris like plastic bags … that muddle a scene,” as well as natural atmospheric phenomena (ice crystals, thermal fluctuations that can register on infrared and radar systems), classified aircraft and the like, and foreign “adversary systems.” The Pentagon report also provides an outline of ongoing efforts, and possible future directions, for trying to improve all analyses. This includes a more systematic collection of military aircraft sensor data, along with FAA data, and applying machine learning to sift through current and historical information to look for “clusters,” patterns and associations with known phenomena like weather balloons, wildlife movements and other Earth-monitoring databases. Challenge No. 5.

The popular association of UAP with hypotheses involving alien technology creates a severe analysis bias. Usually, science tries to move stepwise towards finding support for a given hypothesis or for eliminating hypotheses, and weighs those options as evenly as possible. But in this case a hypothesis that would require extraordinarily robust evidence in order to be supported (as with Carl Sagan’s famous dictum “Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence”), regardless of what some people say, hangs heavily over any analysis or discussion, and there is a vocal community who feel that the answer is already known. That’s a problem. In fact, and rather ironically, the “sociocultural stigmas” around recording surprising observations mentioned in the report are undoubtedly exacerbated by elements of the UFO community that express ideas or beliefs that are, well, fantastical in nature.

Consequently, observers such as highly trained, professional pilots are likely going to be reticent to mention things they are very surprised by. This relates to point No. 3 and creates bias because the unreported incidents, if further analyzed, could provide significant insight—especially as to how often human observers are simply confused, as opposed to witnessing genuinely unusual phenomena. Where does all of this leave us?. Well, the Pentagon report does suggest ways to improve data collection and analysis, as I’ve described.

It also points out that if some UAP do represent physical hazards, or security challenges, it would be important to figure that out. In that sense, there is some possible risk mitigation to be had by investigating UAP further, irrespective of an eventually mundane or extraordinary explanation. As a scientist who studies the possibilities of life elsewhere in the cosmos, I find myself saying “Well, it seems worth having some more work done on this.” But that’s not because I think it’s likely that extraterrestrials or their probes could be dropping into Earth’s atmosphere. Although as a rational thinker I can’t, and shouldn’t, permanently exclude such possibilities, my point No. 5 bothers me enough that I’d rather follow the stepwise approach.

There are other benefits to that strategy too. In particular, I think that the idea of a vastly more systematic collection of data (from things like state-of-the-art camera systems placed on aircraft or in monitoring locations) would be an interesting activity regardless of what is actually taking place in our skies. New kinds of high-resolution time-lapse data and high-fidelity monitoring of our planetary environment could have many additional benefits as we try to navigate our way through a perilously changing world. From atmospherics to animal migration to human-generated garbage floating in the air and on the sea, seeing what’s actually going on is always going to help. This is an opinion and analysis article.

The views expressed by the author or authors are not necessarily those of Scientific American.For the past two weeks, much of the world has watched, transfixed, as Olympic gymnasts flip, leap and vault for the gold. Under the glare of the spotlight, a lifetime of practice and physical mastery has come to fruition as these athletes perform superhuman tricks the average human could never fathom executing. But outside the stadiums of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, a different kind of acrobatic feat is performed every day. Both closer to the Olympics, in the forests of Japan, and in treetops all around the world, squirrels leap meters through the air to get from branch to branch. The stakes are different in this natural arena.

The squirrels scurry around to find morsels of food, all the while trying to evade occasional airborne predators such as hawks. But the speed and ease with which they navigate the challenging and unpredictable canopy environment is “spectacular,” says University of California, Berkeley, biomechanics researcher Robert Full. The animals easily land leaps several times the length of their body. And we do not really know how they do it, Full says. €œHow do they know that they have the capability in their body to achieve those jumps?.

€ he asks. The coordination between a squirrel’s body and mind is not just a curiosity for human observers, Full explains. The well-executed moves could influence the design of smarter robots, incorporating some of the squirrels’ best physical traits. Their flexible spine, grippy paws and grabby claws. And squirrels are not just daredevil acrobats.

They are adept learners, too. €œThey have really good memories,” says Gregory Byrnes, who studies biomechanics at Siena College in Loudonville, N.Y. A squirrel you see scampering through the park has likely followed that same path before and mapped the route out in its brain, Byrnes says. And when the weather turns cold in the winter, the diligent rodents recall and retrieve the many caches of nuts they have stashed all over their territory. It is this squirreling away that differentiates them from other arboreal animals, such as some primates, says Nathaniel Hunt, who studies biomechanics at the University of Nebraska Omaha.

Pair that learning ability with a responsive, flexible body, and you’ve got the makings of an extraordinary robot, he says. Hunt and his colleagues wanted to evaluate three aspects of squirrels’ skills. Their decision-making, learning and capacity for innovation. To capture the capabilities of free-ranging animals, the researchers decided to test these qualities in wild fox squirrels in an outdoor setup in the woods near U.C. Berkeley.

First they had to get the wild squirrels to actually participate in experiments— not an easy task with such wily animals. €œThere were some squirrels that would get distracted and just decide, ‘It’s time to take a nap,’” Hunt says. Luckily, most of the subjects understood what to do after they had a few tries and received several reward peanuts. As any gardener with a bird feeder will tell you, “they’re very food-motivated,” Hunt says. The researchers put the squirrels through an outdoor obstacle course and tracked their leaps with high-speed video.

In one task, they coaxed the subjects to jump across gaps of different distances from branchlike wooden rods that behaved like diving boards. The ledges bent easily under the squirrels’ weight, depending on how far the animals stood from the “tree trunk.” This situation forced them to make a decision. Should they jump from the end of a branch to shorten the distance but risk an unstable bend when that branch is compliant?. Or should they stay closer to the “trunk” when they launch but risk the longer jump?. The squirrels were six times more sensitive to the bendiness of the branch than to the distance of the jump, the researchers report in a paper published today in Science.

€œThey’re much more influenced by the amount the branch is going to flex rather than the distance they have to leap across,” Hunt says of the squirrels. In their little brain, there might be an element of self-confidence at play. The squirrels are much surer of their own jumping ability than they are that the bending branch underneath them will not snap and fall, Hunt postulates. When the scientists altered the flexibility of the branch or the distance to leap, the squirrels quickly adjusted their technique to match the changes, learning within just a few tries to alter the velocity of their launch. But the real fun started when the team placed the “branches” against a vertical wall to extend the leap distance even farther.

Surprisingly, instead of merely jumping between ledges, the squirrels bounded and pushed off the wall in a wide array of parkourlike moves, which the researchers quantified and cataloged. The squirrels used a wall to establish an additional point of contact to make midair adjustments, either further propelling themselves forward or braking to slow down as they careened off the vertical surface, Hunt says. €œOne thing that really surprised me was the extent to which they would use any kind of structure they could reach,” he says. The scientists were not expecting the squirrels to use the wall to their advantage or to refine their parkour techniques over subsequent trails, Full explains. €œThey innovated right in front of our eyes!.

€ he says. None of the squirrels fell in any of the trials. Some did not land on the target surface with perfect finesse. They might swing under or keel over the platform, for example. But the animals made the landing every time.

€œThis is really cool,” says Byrnes, who was not involved with the research. €œIt’s a great quantification of these things that animals do but which we don’t know how to describe.” Byrnes says he is curious to learn about the deeper mechanics of the leaps to see what the limbs are doing and how much energy a squirrel loses with different types of jumps. The work by Hunt and Full’s team is part of a larger, multi-institutional collaboration to study and apply the principles of squirrel locomotion. In addition to creating robots that can make similar moves, researchers are studying what exactly happens in a squirrel’s brain as it makes these split-second leaps and how the act of making these jumps develops over time as a baby squirrel grows up. Though the animals are ubiquitous, Full says, we are just starting to understand and appreciate how they scamper through the treetops.

€œThey make great choices, and they’re very creative,” he adds. €œThey’re extraordinary.”President Biden is set to announce twin policies today aimed at slashing car emissions and accelerating widespread electric vehicle adoption in an effort to tackle climate change and out-compete Chinese manufacturers, according to senior administration officials. The long-awaited moves will usher in one of the nation’s strongest-ever climate regulations and target 50% of all vehicles sold by 2030 to be electric. Administration officials lauded the plan as a “paradigm shift.” Some climate experts, however, said the policies fall short of what is needed to stave off catastrophic warming, and critics described Biden’s efforts as incomparable to the stronger actions of Europe and other countries. The first prong of the administration’s plan aims to restore former President Obama’s greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles, which were rolled back by former President Trump.

The proposed rule, which is jointly set by EPA and a division within the Transportation Department, would incrementally ratchet up fuel efficiency requirements through model year 2026. The president will also sign an executive order tomorrow, flanked by auto industry officials and union representatives, setting a target by which half of all car sales would be electric models within nine years. Eligible vehicles include electric, plug-in hybrid, and battery and fuel cell EVs. The order will also direct federal agencies to begin drafting fuel efficiency standards for cars made after 2026. Those new tailpipe rules will be crucial to meeting Biden’s goal of achieving net-zero emissions by 2050, experts said.

Transportation is the country’s largest source of greenhouse gases, and cars account for the bulk of that carbon pollution. General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co. And Stellantis NV, the company formerly known as Fiat Chrysler, praised Biden’s plan to sign the executive order, but stopped short of offering a firm commitment to hit the 50% EV target. The companies said they have a “shared aspiration to achieve sales of 40-50% of annual U.S. Volumes of electric vehicles.” “Our recent product, technology, and investment announcements highlight our collective commitment to be leaders in the U.S.

Transition to electric vehicles,” the companies said in a joint statement. Under Obama, auto companies were required to raise fuel economy 5% each year through 2026. But Trump reduced that rate to 1.5% annually. Trump also repealed California’s legal authority to set its own standards, which the Biden administration is working to restore. In 2019, five car companies—Ford, BMW, Honda Motor Co.

Ltd., Volkswagen AG and Volvo—broke with competitors and reached a deal with California to increase miles per gallon by 3.7% a year. Biden’s proposed rule would apply the California framework for model year 2023 and increase mileage standards to 5% in 2025 and at least 5% in 2026. Paul Bledsoe, a strategic adviser for the Progressive Policy Institute, said the proposed rule is “aggressive.” “But more broadly, the administration is trying to provide market incentives for the automakers to switch their fleets toward electric vehicles,” said Bledsoe, who served as a Department of Energy consultant under Obama and worked on climate change in the Clinton administration. €œRegulations are just a backstop to what should be an attempt to transform the entire industry through consumer demand and technological progress.” But Dan Sperling, a member of the California Air Resources Board, said the standards aren’t strong enough to motivate car companies to scale up their sales of EVs. €œThis is a sideshow to the transition to electric vehicles,” he said.

€œOther countries have far more stringent standards and far more aggressive commitments to EVs, and that includes Europe and China.” The European Union has proposed banning the sale of gasoline engines by 2035, which is a necessary step to stave off catastrophic warming, according to an International Energy Agency report released earlier this year (Climatewire, May 18). California and Massachusetts have also committed to ending the sale of gas-powered vehicles by 2035, and at least 11 other states are considering it. €œThe administration is going to make this announcement as if this is some big sign of climate progress,” said Holly Burke, communications director for Evergreen Action. Under current federal policy, a Rhodium Group analysis forecasts that EV sales would reach 11% to 19% of new car purchases by 2026. By 2031, Rhodium found that EVs would be on track to reach 27% to 39% of new car purchases.

€œAnd what’s frustrating is that [the benchmarks are] way below where they need to be—and way less ambitious than it seems like they easily could be,” Burke said. Biden has made EVs a cornerstone of his climate agenda. But he’s offered few hard promises about how he wants to reshape transportation. He campaigned on specific targets for environmental justice, the electricity sector, buildings and reaching net-zero emissions across the entire economy. In office, he’s set even stronger benchmarks for nationwide decarbonization.

But his transportation goals remain harder to pin down—which is the opposite of how it should be, environmentalists say. The president has more power over transportation emissions than almost any other sector. €œOf the things Biden could do on climate through his existing executive authority, cars are one of the places he could move the needle the most,” Burke said. Biden’s car rulemaking coincides with trouble for his EV agenda in Congress. Biden promised to build 500,000 EV charging stations, but the White House started downplaying that commitment after money was cut from the bipartisan infrastructure deal.

The spending package is expected to provide $7.5 billion for EV chargers. That’s half of what the administration had planned for, though some officials think it’s still enough to hit Biden’s charger goal. Reprinted from E&E News with permission from POLITICO, LLC. Copyright 2021. E&E News provides essential news for energy and environment professionals.Comparing the relative sizes of bird species has long seemed an impossible task—too many species simply lack reliable counts.

A recent influx of citizen science data, however, allowed researchers to make global abundance estimates for 9,700 species, about 92 percent of all birds on Earth. Biologists Corey T. Callaghan, Shinichi Nakagawa and William K. Cornwell, all at the University of New South Wales in Australia, combined scientific data for 724 well-studied species with counts from the app eBird, where people around the world can submit bird sightings. The researchers used an algorithm to extrapolate estimates for all species in their sample.

The results, published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, confirm a common pattern among animals. Across the globe there are many species with small populations isolated in niche habitats and relatively few species that have managed to expand over a wide territory and grow their population into the hundreds of millions or billions. Eventually the findings could help with conservation efforts. €œThe next step is, Which species are rare because that's just the way Mother Nature made them, and which species are rare because we [humans] screwed up?. € Callaghan asks.

This project did not try to answer these questions, but it is a “necessary first step” toward doing so, he says. Credit. Jen Christiansen (graphic), Liz Wahid (birds). Source. €œGlobal Abundance Estimates for 9,700 Bird Species,” by Corey T.

Callaghan, Shinichi Nakagawa and William K. Cornwell, in PNAS, Vol.

Renova cream pump

Kate Oakes, http://www.grundschule-muehlenberg.de/viagra-for-men-price/ Chicago renova cream pump. Linda Friehling, MD, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Shipra Gupta, MD, Pediatric Infectious renova cream pump Disease, West Virginia University.

Mark Pasternack, MD, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston. Michael Smit, renova cream pump MD, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Brenda Zuniga, Woodbridge, VA.

American Academy of Pediatrics renova cream pump. €œCritical Updates on skin care products,” skin care products. State-Level Data renova cream pump Report.” AAP News.

€œCDC releases guidance for clinicians on heart inflammation after skin care products_19 vaccination,” May 27, 2021. Pfizer. €œPfizer-Biontech Announce Positive Topline Results of Pivotal skin care products treatment Study in Adolescents,” March 31, 2021.

CDC. €œskin care products in Children and Teens -, Myocarditis and Pericarditis, MIS-C Info for Parents,” “Weekly Review, May 28, 2021,” “Stop the Spread in Children,” “When You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated,” “skin care products Breakthrough Case Investigations and Reporting,” “Guidance for Wearing Masks,” “Choosing Safer Activities.” Rochelle Walensky, MD, director, CDC.By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, June 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients with active cancer are more likely to die from skin care products than those who've survived cancer and patients who've never had cancer, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed the records of nearly 4,200 patients hospitalized at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City who tested positive for skin care, the renova that causes skin care products.

Of those patients, 233 had an active cancer diagnosis. In-hospital rates of death from skin care products were about 34% among those with active cancer but fell to about 28% among those with a history of cancer or with no history of cancer, the study found. Those with active blood cancers had the highest risk of death from skin care products, according to the study published recently in the journal Cancer.

Receiving anti-cancer therapy -- including chemotherapy, molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapy -- within three months before hospitalization was not linked to a higher risk of death, the researchers said. "Among those hospitalized with active cancer and skin care products, recent cancer therapy was not associated with worse outcomes," said study senior author Dr. Daniel Becker, a medical oncologist at NYU Langone.

Therefore, "people with active cancer should take precautions against getting skin care products, including vaccination, but need not avoid therapy for cancer," Becker said in a journal news release. The findings also highlight the importance of skin care products vaccination for cancer patients, according to the journal's incoming editor-in-chief, Dr. Suresh Ramalingam.

He's deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University in Atlanta and assistant dean for cancer research at the university's School of Medicine. More information The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on cancer patients and skin care products.

SOURCE. Cancer, news release, June 7, 2021 WebMD News from HealthDay Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved."If we're eating foods that offer less energy, we'll consume less energy and still be able to eat these satisfying portions," Cunningham said.

These can be water-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, said study co-author Barbara Rolls, professor in the nutritional sciences department in the College of Health and Human Development at Penn State. Though slowing down eating might be an option for reducing overconsumption, it's hard to do, Rolls said, and some evidence suggests that eating speed is a genetically based behavior. "I think it's clear that if people could be more mindful, slow down and pay attention, it could help them to eat less.

But it's like all of the things around weight management, it's tough to actually get people to do it," Rolls said. In her lab, they sometimes change the calorie density of food, reducing it by 30% without people noticing, Rolls said. They do this by mixing in more vegetables, using more herbs and spices and just a little bit less fat, but maintaining high palatability.

People can make these little changes at home, too. The research will be presented this week at the American Society for Nutrition virtual annual meeting. Findings presented at medical meetings are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The research was funded by Jenny Craig, Inc., and the U.S. National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "I'm honestly not surprised," said Dana Hunnes, an adjunct assistant professor in the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, who was not involved in the study.

"There's been some data over the years that has indicated that as portion sizes have grown, people also tend to eat more." It can take between about 15 to 20 minutes for your body to acknowledge you're getting full and starting to go through the digestion process, Hunnes said. "It was interesting that they came to a conclusion that faster eating and larger bites also was related to eating more, but again that doesn't really surprise me because I think it's pretty well known that when people eat faster it takes longer to get full, and so therefore you tend to eat more and then larger bites, just bite for bite is getting more calories in," she said.Therapeutic virtual reality (VR), the use of the immersive, computer-generated technology in medicine, is on the fast track to widespread use. In some hospitals and clinics, your doctor can already prescribe a visit to a VR world to ease your pain or anxiety or to explain a complex medical procedure or condition.Here’s how it works.

Put on a motion-sensing VR headset (and sometimes handheld controllers) and your outside environment vanishes. It’s instantly and completely replaced with a 360-degree virtual world that you can enter, move around in, and interact with.If you need distraction from pain or stress, you may find yourself beneath the ocean, surrounded by dolphins. As you float along, you can look up and see the sun shining through the water’s surface.

Look down and you see dolphins swimming around and below you. You can hear the echo of the underwater world and the sounds of the big mammals that surround you.The experience feels real, and that’s how your brain processes it. It’s this ability that gives VR so much therapeutic power and potential, says Brennen Spiegel, MD, professor of medicine and public health and director of Health Services Research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

Continued “Even if you know intellectually that you’re not at the beach, your brain can’t live in two realities at once. Instead, the brain accepts [the input] it’s given,” says Spiegel, author of VRx. How Virtual Therapeutics Will Revolutionize Medicine.

This sense of what scientists call “presence” in the virtual world means it’s harder for the brain to focus on other stimuli, such as negative input like pain and anxiety, Spiegel says.“VR also triggers strong emotions, and we are primed to learn things when they are tied to emotion,” he says. The boost VR’s emotional engagement gives to learning opens up many other uses, from medical education to recovery from injuries and illness.Why VR Is Set to Enter Mainstream CareDoctors have studied VR for pain control and some other medical uses for decades. Now, however, advances in technology mean the hardware is cheaper, smaller, faster, more reliable, and easier to use.

This means you can expect to see more and more options for therapeutic VR.Continued “The current technology and hardware changes so fast and improves dramatically in such a short time that what we are using today will look quaint and antiquated in just a few years,” says David Axelrod, MD, a pediatric cardiologist at Stanford Children’s Health in the San Francisco Bay Area.His group uses Stanford’s Virtual Heart program to teach medical students about congenital heart defects, explain complex procedures to patients and their parents, and to help surgeons plan surgeries.When it comes to pain management, VR may help fill an urgent need in our society for nondrug pain relief.“We are in the midst of an opioid epidemic and VR offers a drug-free option for pain control,” Spiegel says. He notes that many patients may still need medication, but the addition of VR therapy may reduce the need for drugs.The FDA recognizes the medical potential of VR and last year held workshops to identify barriers to therapeutic VR and speed development of solutions. The FDA in 2020 granted breakthrough-device designation to a VR system designed to ease low back pain and fibromyalgia pain.Continued This kind of recognition of therapeutic VR benefits may help hurdle the technology over one of its major barriers to greater use.

Insurance coverage, Spiegel says.Here’s a look at some of the rapidly evolving uses of VR in medicine.Pain ManagementVR for pain control is one of the best-studied and most-used applications of the technology. Doctors have known for decades that this technological “distraction therapy” is an effective tool to combat pain and the fear of pain.“Pain is a perception that’s coupled to your attention, mood, and emotions,” explains Thomas Caruso, MD, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford School of Medicine.“With VR, we can help modulate a patient’s mindset to be less focused on pain and anxiety,” says Caruso, who is a co-founder of CHARIOT (Childhood Anxiety Reduction through Innovation and Technology), Lucile Packard’s immersive technology program in which more than 150 patients a month use VR as part of their treatment.Continued When children are engaged in VR games, they often barely feel the stick of needle or an IV going in, Caruso says. Research has also shown that children who wear VR headsets have less pain during dental care.

And children lose -- or never develop -- fears about these procedures. This means many can skip the sedation that doctors might otherwise need to use.VR helps with pain control in adults, as well. When VR is used along with medication, it can reduce the severe pain people have during wound care for burn injuries.It can also help people who live with ongoing pain.

In one study of low back pain and fibromyalgia, VR reduced discomfort by more than 30%. Patients in the study were also much less likely to have pain that interfered with their sleep and mood. VR can ease pain in people with many types of medical conditions, from cancer to orthopedic problems to stomach pain, according to Spiegel’s recent research.

Continued His colleagues at Cedars-Sinai are also using VR to make labor and delivery less painful. Their 2020 study found that women who used VR for 30 minutes during labor had less pain and lower heart rates than those not using the technology.All this evidence that VR works to help control pain means Cedars-Sinai will this fall move VR from the research setting to a clinical pain service for hospitalized patients.“If a patient is interested in VR therapy, they’ll get a visit from a specialist called a ‘virtualist,’ who at Cedars-Sinai is a psychiatrist trained in therapeutic VR,” Spiegel says. €œThe virtualist will do an evaluation to decide if the patient is someone who can benefit from VR.

The technology is not appropriate for all patients or all medical conditions.”If the virtualist decides VR can help the patient, they will then tailor a prescription for the technology. This includes deciding what kind of virtual experience will best help the individual and how often the patient should use VR.“VR is like a syringe and it’s the medicine, which with VR is the software, that matters,” he says.Medical Procedure AnxietyChemotherapy is a stressful and sometimes uncomfortable experience. Some medical centers now use VR to help their patients escape from anxiety or the boredom of treatments that can take hours.Instead of being stuck with a view of IVs or focused on discomfort or worry, patients can put on headset and find themselves in a winter forest, a flower-filled meadow, or on a peaceful beach.

A 2020 review of more than 20 studies found VR reduced symptoms of anxiety, as well as depression and fatigue.Doctors can also use VR to explain complex procedures to young children and their parents. Children who are set to undergo brain surgery, for example, can now use the technology to “fly” through 3D images of their own brain as their surgeon explains exactly what will happen during their procedure.“Kids think of it like a video game. They use a joystick to zoom in through corridors in their brain, look at their tumor, and view things upside down,” says Gerald Grant, MD, endowed professor of neurosurgery and division chief of pediatric neurosurgery at the Brain and Behavior Center at Stanford Children’s Health.Continued VR, he says, brings kids into the process and takes away some of their fear.“I love it because it engages the kids, who otherwise might not take much part in the conversation,” Grant says.

€œOften, they name their tumor after some evil superhero and go after it. We give them the ability to shoot at it. It really takes away some of the mystery and fear for the whole family.”Physical Therapy and RehabilitationTherapists are using VR to help people rehabilitate from strokes, Parkinson's disease, and injuries.With VR-based physical therapy and rehabilitation, therapists can choose software that helps the patient improve specific skills and targets individual problems.

Patients get immediate feedback on how well they’re doing exercises. All of this, along with the immersive engagement of VR, may help motivate patients to do more than they think they can.Caruso says one of the most striking uses of VR he’s seen has been in children with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a condition that causes ongoing pain in one or more limbs.Continued “Children with CRPS can have pain every day of their life,” he says. €œWith VR rehabilitation, the therapist may use a program in which they make specific movements to squash watermelons.

Because they are now focused more on squashing those watermelons instead of on their pain, they can participate more fully in rehabilitation.”Caruso says this helps propel kids to get better faster. €œI’ve seen children come into the clinic on crutches and by the end of the session, they no longer need them. VR empowers them to believe, ‘Yes, I can do this,’” he says.

Medical TrainingVR is also opening up new possibilities in the education of future doctors.“The VR environment is so much more immersive, interactive, and engaging than many other educational formats that it has potential to change the landscape of medical education,” Axelrod says. €œWe can allow students to actually experience the content they need to learn and understand. They can go inside a beating heart and listen to heart sounds as they watch blood flow within the heart.”Multiple studies show VR used for medical student education improves learning and the understanding of the body’s physical structures.

It also helps students develop the motor skills they need for surgery.Surgical PlanningVR takes surgical collaboration to a new level. When Grant’s neurosurgical team at Stanford comes together to plan a brain surgery, they can all don linked headsets and interact with a VR setting created from scans of their patient’s brain.“At the end of day this is all about improving safety,” he says. €œWe discuss ways to approach difficult cases, such as skull-based tumors.

This kind of collaboration allows us to plan well in advance how to safely navigate through these small corridors in the brain to get to the tumor.”For patients, this can mean less time in the operating room and under anesthesia. For surgeons, it means they can push the envelope and safely explore new ways to do complex procedures, Grant says.VR Isn’t for EveryoneWith all its potential, therapeutic VR isn’t right for every patient or every medical condition, Spiegel says.“I’ve literally been asked if VR can cure cancer, and the answer, of course, is no,” he says. €œVR is not a cure-all for every condition.

And in most cases, it’s best used as an addition to traditional therapy, not as a standalone treatment.”Continued Most people can use VR without problems. A few get “cybersickness,” nausea that’s similar to that of motion sickness. It goes away when you take off the headset.

Better, faster hardware and software mean this issue is happening less often. It affects about 5% to 10% of people who use VR, Spiegel says.If you have a VR headset, there are now thousands of programs you can use without a doctor’s prescription that promise better health and wellness. If you’re interested in the therapeutic possibilities of the technology, you can check out Cedar-Sinai’s list of recommended VR programs.Spiegel says his group has vetted these programs for safety but adds that therapeutic VR has the most benefits when it’s part of a collaboration with a medical professional.“VR opens up conversations between patients and their providers that they might not otherwise have,” he says.

€œThis includes thinking about the role of the mind and its connection to the body. VR requires that we understand the patient in a different, more holistic way. And to me, that is the more humanizing way of thinking about people and how to best care for them.”.

Kate Oakes, Chicago buy cheap renova online http://www.grundschule-muehlenberg.de/viagra-for-men-price/. Linda Friehling, MD, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV. Shipra Gupta, MD, Pediatric Infectious Disease, West Virginia buy cheap renova online University. Mark Pasternack, MD, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston.

Michael Smit, buy cheap renova online MD, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Brenda Zuniga, Woodbridge, VA. American Academy buy cheap renova online of Pediatrics. €œCritical Updates on skin care products,” skin care products.

State-Level Data buy cheap renova online Report.” AAP News. €œCDC releases guidance for clinicians on heart inflammation after skin care products_19 vaccination,” May 27, 2021. Pfizer. €œPfizer-Biontech Announce Positive Topline Results of Pivotal skin care products treatment Study in Adolescents,” March 31, 2021.

CDC. €œskin care products in Children and Teens -, Myocarditis and Pericarditis, MIS-C Info for Parents,” “Weekly Review, May 28, 2021,” “Stop the Spread in Children,” “When You’ve Been Fully Vaccinated,” “skin care products Breakthrough Case Investigations and Reporting,” “Guidance for Wearing Masks,” “Choosing Safer Activities.” Rochelle Walensky, MD, director, CDC.By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, June 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients with active cancer are more likely to die from skin care products than those who've survived cancer and patients who've never had cancer, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed the records of nearly 4,200 patients hospitalized at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City who tested positive for skin care, the renova that causes skin care products. Of those patients, 233 had an active cancer diagnosis.

In-hospital rates of death from skin care products were about 34% among those with active cancer but fell to about 28% among those with a history of cancer or with no history of cancer, the study found. Those with active blood cancers had the highest risk of death from skin care products, according to the study published recently in the journal Cancer. Receiving anti-cancer therapy -- including chemotherapy, molecularly targeted therapies and immunotherapy -- within three months before hospitalization was not linked to a higher risk of death, the researchers said. "Among those hospitalized with active cancer and skin care products, recent cancer therapy was not associated with worse outcomes," said study senior author Dr.

Daniel Becker, a medical oncologist at NYU Langone. Therefore, "people with active cancer should take precautions against getting skin care products, including vaccination, but need not avoid therapy for cancer," Becker said in a journal news release. The findings also highlight the importance of skin care products vaccination for cancer patients, according to the journal's incoming editor-in-chief, Dr. Suresh Ramalingam.

He's deputy director of the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University in Atlanta and assistant dean for cancer research at the university's School of Medicine. More information The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on cancer patients and skin care products. SOURCE.

Cancer, news release, June 7, 2021 WebMD News from HealthDay Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved."If we're eating foods that offer less energy, we'll consume less energy and still be able to eat these satisfying portions," Cunningham said. These can be water-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, said study co-author Barbara Rolls, professor in the nutritional sciences department in the College of Health and Human Development at Penn State. Though slowing down eating might be an option for reducing overconsumption, it's hard to do, Rolls said, and some evidence suggests that eating speed is a genetically based behavior.

"I think it's clear that if people could be more mindful, slow down and pay attention, it could help them to eat less. But it's like all of the things around weight management, it's tough to actually get people to do it," Rolls said. In her lab, they sometimes change the calorie density of food, reducing it by 30% without people noticing, Rolls said. They do this by mixing in more vegetables, using more herbs and spices and just a little bit less fat, but maintaining high palatability.

People can make these little changes at home, too. The research will be presented this week at the American Society for Nutrition virtual annual meeting. Findings presented at medical meetings are considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. The research was funded by Jenny Craig, Inc., and the U.S.

National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "I'm honestly not surprised," said Dana Hunnes, an adjunct assistant professor in the Fielding School of Public Health at UCLA, who was not involved in the study. "There's been some data over the years that has indicated that as portion sizes have grown, people also tend to eat more." It can take between about 15 to 20 minutes for your body to acknowledge you're getting full and starting to go through the digestion process, Hunnes said. "It was interesting that they came to a conclusion that faster eating and larger bites also was related to eating more, but again that doesn't really surprise me because I think it's pretty well known that when people eat faster it takes longer to get full, and so therefore you tend to eat more and then larger bites, just bite for bite is getting more calories in," she said.Therapeutic virtual reality (VR), the use of the immersive, computer-generated technology in medicine, is on the fast track to widespread use.

In some hospitals and clinics, your doctor can already prescribe a visit to a VR world to ease your pain or anxiety or to explain a complex medical procedure or condition.Here’s how it works. Put on a motion-sensing VR headset (and sometimes handheld controllers) and your outside environment vanishes. It’s instantly and completely replaced with a 360-degree virtual world that you can enter, move around in, and interact with.If you need distraction from pain or stress, you may find yourself beneath the ocean, surrounded by dolphins. As you float along, you can look up and see the sun shining through the water’s surface.

Look down and you see dolphins swimming around and below you. You can hear the echo of the underwater world and the sounds of the big mammals that surround you.The experience feels real, and that’s how your brain processes it. It’s this ability that gives VR so much therapeutic power and potential, says Brennen Spiegel, MD, professor of medicine and public health and director of Health Services Research at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Continued “Even if you know intellectually that you’re not at the beach, your brain can’t live in two realities at once.

Instead, the brain accepts [the input] it’s given,” says Spiegel, author of VRx. How Virtual Therapeutics Will Revolutionize Medicine. This sense of what scientists call “presence” in the virtual world means it’s harder for the brain to focus on other stimuli, such as negative input like pain and anxiety, Spiegel says.“VR also triggers strong emotions, and we are primed to learn things when they are tied to emotion,” he says. The boost VR’s emotional engagement gives to learning opens up many other uses, from medical education to recovery from injuries and illness.Why VR Is Set to Enter Mainstream CareDoctors have studied VR for pain control and some other medical uses for decades.

Now, however, advances in technology mean the hardware is cheaper, smaller, faster, more reliable, and easier to use. This means you can expect to see more and more options for therapeutic VR.Continued “The current technology and hardware changes so fast and improves dramatically in such a short time that what we are using today will look quaint and antiquated in just a few years,” says David Axelrod, MD, a pediatric cardiologist at Stanford Children’s Health in the San Francisco Bay Area.His group uses Stanford’s Virtual Heart program to teach medical students about congenital heart defects, explain complex procedures to patients and their parents, and to help surgeons plan surgeries.When it comes to pain management, VR may help fill an urgent need in our society for nondrug pain relief.“We are in the midst of an opioid epidemic and VR offers a drug-free option for pain control,” Spiegel says. He notes that many patients may still need medication, but the addition of VR therapy may reduce the need for drugs.The FDA recognizes the medical potential of VR and last year held workshops to identify barriers to therapeutic VR and speed development of solutions. The FDA in 2020 granted breakthrough-device designation to a VR system designed to ease low back pain and fibromyalgia pain.Continued This kind of recognition of therapeutic VR benefits may help hurdle the technology over one of its major barriers to greater use.

Insurance coverage, Spiegel says.Here’s a look at some of the rapidly evolving uses of VR in medicine.Pain ManagementVR for pain control is one of the best-studied and most-used applications of the technology. Doctors have known for decades that this technological “distraction therapy” is an effective tool to combat pain and the fear of pain.“Pain is a perception that’s coupled to your attention, mood, and emotions,” explains Thomas Caruso, MD, a pediatric anesthesiologist at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford and professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine at Stanford School of Medicine.“With VR, we can help modulate a patient’s mindset to be less focused on pain and anxiety,” says Caruso, who is a co-founder of CHARIOT (Childhood Anxiety Reduction through Innovation and Technology), Lucile Packard’s immersive technology program in which more than 150 patients a month use VR as part of their treatment.Continued When children are engaged in VR games, they often barely feel the stick of needle or an IV going in, Caruso says. Research has also shown that children who wear VR headsets have less pain during dental care. And children lose -- or never develop -- fears about these procedures.

This means many can skip the sedation that doctors might otherwise need to use.VR helps with pain control in adults, as well. When VR is used along with medication, it can reduce the severe pain people have during wound care for burn injuries.It can also help people who live with ongoing pain. In one study of low back pain and fibromyalgia, VR reduced discomfort by more than 30%. Patients in the study were also much less likely to have pain that interfered with their sleep and mood.

VR can ease pain in people with many types of medical conditions, from cancer to orthopedic problems to stomach pain, according to Spiegel’s recent research. Continued His colleagues at Cedars-Sinai are also using VR to make labor and delivery less painful. Their 2020 study found that women who used VR for 30 minutes during labor had less pain and lower heart rates than those not using the technology.All this evidence that VR works to help control pain means Cedars-Sinai will this fall move VR from the research setting to a clinical pain service for hospitalized patients.“If a patient is interested in VR therapy, they’ll get a visit from a specialist called a ‘virtualist,’ who at Cedars-Sinai is a psychiatrist trained in therapeutic VR,” Spiegel says. €œThe virtualist will do an evaluation to decide if the patient is someone who can benefit from VR.

The technology is not appropriate for all patients or all medical conditions.”If the virtualist decides VR can help the patient, they will then tailor a prescription for the technology. This includes deciding what kind of virtual experience will best help the individual and how often the patient should use VR.“VR is like a syringe and it’s the medicine, which with VR is the software, that matters,” he says.Medical Procedure AnxietyChemotherapy is a stressful and sometimes uncomfortable experience. Some medical centers now use VR to help their patients escape from anxiety or the boredom of treatments that can take hours.Instead of being stuck with a view of IVs or focused on discomfort or worry, patients can put on headset and find themselves in a winter forest, a flower-filled meadow, or on a peaceful beach. A 2020 review of more than 20 studies found VR reduced symptoms of anxiety, as well as depression and fatigue.Doctors can also use VR to explain complex procedures to young children and their parents.

Children who are set to undergo brain surgery, for example, can now use the technology to “fly” through 3D images of their own brain as their surgeon explains exactly what will happen during their procedure.“Kids think of it like a video game. They use a joystick to zoom in through corridors in their brain, look at their tumor, and view things upside down,” says Gerald Grant, MD, endowed professor of neurosurgery and division chief of pediatric neurosurgery at the Brain and Behavior Center at Stanford Children’s Health.Continued VR, he says, brings kids into the process and takes away some of their fear.“I love it because it engages the kids, who otherwise might not take much part in the conversation,” Grant says. €œOften, they name their tumor after some evil superhero and go after it. We give them the ability to shoot at it.

It really takes away some of the mystery and fear for the whole family.”Physical Therapy and RehabilitationTherapists are using VR to help people rehabilitate from strokes, Parkinson's disease, and injuries.With VR-based physical therapy and rehabilitation, therapists can choose software that helps the patient improve specific skills and targets individual problems. Patients get immediate feedback on how well they’re doing exercises. All of this, along with the immersive engagement of VR, may help motivate patients to do more than they think they can.Caruso says one of the most striking uses of VR he’s seen has been in children with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a condition that causes ongoing pain in one or more limbs.Continued “Children with CRPS can have pain every day of their life,” he says. €œWith VR rehabilitation, the therapist may use a program in which they make specific movements to squash watermelons.

Because they are now focused more on squashing those watermelons instead of on their pain, they can participate more fully in rehabilitation.”Caruso says this helps propel kids to get better faster. €œI’ve seen children come into the clinic on crutches and by the end of the session, they no longer need them. VR empowers them to believe, ‘Yes, I can do this,’” he says. Medical TrainingVR is also opening up new possibilities in the education of future doctors.“The VR environment is so much more immersive, interactive, and engaging than many other educational formats that it has potential to change the landscape of medical education,” Axelrod says.

€œWe can allow students to actually experience the content they need to learn and understand. They can go inside a beating heart and listen to heart sounds as they watch blood flow within the heart.”Multiple studies show VR used for medical student education improves learning and the understanding of the body’s physical structures. It also helps students develop the motor skills they need for surgery.Surgical PlanningVR takes surgical collaboration to a new level. When Grant’s neurosurgical team at Stanford comes together to plan a brain surgery, they can all don linked headsets and interact with a VR setting created from scans of their patient’s brain.“At the end of day this is all about improving safety,” he says.

€œWe discuss ways to approach difficult cases, such as skull-based tumors. This kind of collaboration allows us to plan well in advance how to safely navigate through these small corridors in the brain to get to the tumor.”For patients, this can mean less time in the operating room and under anesthesia. For surgeons, it means they can push the envelope and safely explore new ways to do complex procedures, Grant says.VR Isn’t for EveryoneWith all its potential, therapeutic VR isn’t right for every patient or every medical condition, Spiegel says.“I’ve literally been asked if VR can cure cancer, and the answer, of course, is no,” he says. €œVR is not a cure-all for every condition.

And in most cases, it’s best used as an addition to traditional therapy, not as a standalone treatment.”Continued Most people can use VR without problems. A few get “cybersickness,” nausea that’s similar to that of motion sickness. It goes away when you take off the headset. Better, faster hardware and software mean this issue is happening less often.

It affects about 5% to 10% of people who use VR, Spiegel says.If you have a VR headset, there are now thousands of programs you can use without a doctor’s prescription that promise better health and wellness. If you’re interested in the therapeutic possibilities of the technology, you can check out Cedar-Sinai’s list of recommended VR programs.Spiegel says his group has vetted these programs for safety but adds that therapeutic VR has the most benefits when it’s part of a collaboration with a medical professional.“VR opens up conversations between patients and their providers that they might not otherwise have,” he says. €œThis includes thinking about the role of the mind and its connection to the body. VR requires that we understand the patient in a different, more holistic way.

And to me, that is the more humanizing way of thinking about people and how to best care for them.”.