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Start Preamble order lasix overnight delivery Notice of amendment. The Secretary issues this amendment pursuant to section 319F-3 of the Public Health Service Act to add additional categories of Qualified Persons and amend the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures. This amendment to the Declaration published on March 17, 2020 (85 FR 15198) is effective as of order lasix overnight delivery August 24, 2020.

Start Further Info Robert P. Kadlec, MD, MTM&H, MS, Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC order lasix overnight delivery 20201. Telephone.

202-205-2882. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information The Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act (PREP Act) authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services (the Secretary) to issue a Declaration to provide liability immunity to certain individuals and entities (Covered Persons) against any claim of loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the manufacture, distribution, administration, or use of medical countermeasures (Covered Countermeasures), except for claims involving “willful misconduct” as defined in the PREP Act. Under the PREP Act, a Declaration may be amended as circumstances warrant.

The PREP Act was enacted on December 30, 2005, as Public Law 109-148, Division C, § 2. It amended the Public Health Service (PHS) Act, adding section 319F-3, which addresses liability immunity, and section 319F-4, which creates a compensation program. These sections are codified at 42 U.S.C.

247d-6d and 42 U.S.C. 247d-6e, respectively. Section 319F-3 of the PHS Act has been amended by the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, enacted on March 13, 2013 and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, Public Law 116-136, enacted on March 27, Start Printed Page 521372020, to expand Covered Countermeasures under the PREP Act.

On January 31, 2020, the Secretary declared a public health emergency pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, 42 U.S.C. 247d, effective January 27, 2020, for the entire United States to aid in the response of the nation's health care community to the COVID-19 outbreak. Pursuant to section 319 of the PHS Act, the Secretary renewed that declaration on April 26, 2020, and July 25, 2020.

On March 10, 2020, the Secretary issued a Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19 (85 FR 15198, Mar. 17, 2020) (the Declaration). On April 10, the Secretary amended the Declaration under the PREP Act to extend liability immunity to covered countermeasures authorized under the CARES Act (85 FR 21012, Apr.

15, 2020). On June 4, the Secretary amended the Declaration to clarify that covered countermeasures under the Declaration include qualified countermeasures that limit the harm COVID-19 might otherwise cause. The Secretary now amends section V of the Declaration to identify as qualified persons covered under the PREP Act, and thus authorizes, certain State-licensed pharmacists to order and administer, and pharmacy interns (who are licensed or registered by their State board of pharmacy and acting under the supervision of a State-licensed pharmacist) to administer, any vaccine that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule (ACIP-recommended vaccines).[] The Secretary also amends section VIII of the Declaration to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures includes not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases.

Description of This Amendment by Section Section V. Covered Persons Under the PREP Act and the Declaration, a “qualified person” is a “covered person.” Subject to certain limitations, a covered person is immune from suit and liability under Federal and State law with respect to all claims for loss caused by, arising out of, relating to, or resulting from the administration or use of a covered countermeasure if a declaration under subsection (b) has been issued with respect to such countermeasure. €œQualified person” includes (A) a licensed health professional or other individual who is authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense such countermeasures under the law of the State in which the countermeasure was prescribed, administered, or dispensed.

Or (B) “a person within a category of persons so identified in a declaration by the Secretary” under subsection (b) of the PREP Act. 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(8).[] By this amendment to the Declaration, the Secretary identifies an additional category of persons who are qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B).[] On May 8, 2020, CDC reported, “The identified declines in routine pediatric vaccine ordering and doses administered might indicate that U.S.

Children and their communities face increased risks for outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases,” and suggested that a decrease in rates of routine childhood vaccinations were due to changes in healthcare access, social distancing, and other COVID-19 mitigation strategies.[] The report also stated that “[p]arental concerns about potentially exposing their children to COVID-19 during well child visits might contribute to the declines observed.” [] On July 10, 2020, CDC reported its findings of a May survey it conducted to assess the capacity of pediatric health care practices to provide immunization services to children during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey, which was limited to practices participating in the Vaccines for Children program, found that, as of mid-May, 15 percent of Northeast pediatric practices were closed, 12.5 percent of Midwest practices were closed, 6.2 percent of practices in the South were closed, and 10 percent of practices in the West were closed. Most practices had reduced office hours for in-person visits.

When asked whether their practices would likely be able to accommodate new patients for immunization services through August, 418 practices (21.3 percent) either responded that this was not likely or the practice was permanently closed or not resuming immunization services for all patients, and 380 (19.6 percent) responded that they were unsure. Urban practices and those in the Northeast were less likely to be able to accommodate new patients compared with rural practices and those in the South, Midwest, or West.[] In response to these troubling developments, CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics have stressed, “Well-child visits and vaccinations are essential services and help make sure children are protected.” [] The Secretary re-emphasizes that important recommendation to parents and legal guardians here. If your child is due for a well-child visit, contact your pediatrician's or other primary-care provider's office and ask about ways that the office safely offers well-child visits and vaccinations.

Many medical offices are taking extra steps to make sure that well-child visits can occur safely during the COVID-19 pandemic, including. Scheduling sick visits and well-child visits during different times of the Start Printed Page 52138day or days of the week, or at different locations. Asking patients to remain outside until it is time for their appointments to reduce the number of people in waiting rooms.

Adhering to recommended social (physical) distancing and other infection-control practices, such as the use of masks. The decrease in childhood-vaccination rates is a public health threat and a collateral harm caused by COVID-19. Together, the United States must turn to available medical professionals to limit the harm and public health threats that may result from decreased immunization rates.

We must quickly do so to avoid preventable infections in children, additional strains on our healthcare system, and any further increase in avoidable adverse health consequences—particularly if such complications coincide with additional resurgence of COVID-19. Together with pediatricians and other healthcare professionals, pharmacists are positioned to expand access to childhood vaccinations. Many States already allow pharmacists to administer vaccines to children of any age.[] Other States permit pharmacists to administer vaccines to children depending on the age—for example, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, or 12 years of age and older.[] Few States restrict pharmacist-administered vaccinations to only adults.[] Many States also allow properly trained individuals under the supervision of a trained pharmacist to administer those vaccines.[] Pharmacists are well positioned to increase access to vaccinations, particularly in certain areas or for certain populations that have too few pediatricians and other primary-care providers, or that are otherwise medically underserved.[] As of 2018, nearly 90 percent of Americans lived within five miles of a community pharmacy.[] Pharmacies often offer extended hours and added convenience.

What is more, pharmacists are trusted healthcare professionals with established relationships with their patients. Pharmacists also have strong relationships with local medical providers and hospitals to refer patients as appropriate. For example, pharmacists already play a significant role in annual influenza vaccination.

In the early 2018-19 season, they administered the influenza vaccine to nearly a third of all adults who received the vaccine.[] Given the potential danger of serious influenza and continuing COVID-19 outbreaks this autumn and the impact that such concurrent outbreaks may have on our population, our healthcare system, and our whole-of-nation response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we must quickly expand access to influenza vaccinations. Allowing more qualified pharmacists to administer the influenza vaccine to children will make vaccinations more accessible. Therefore, the Secretary amends the Declaration to identify State-licensed pharmacists (and pharmacy interns acting under their supervision if the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy) as qualified persons under section 247d-6d(i)(8)(B) when the pharmacist orders and either the pharmacist or the supervised pharmacy intern administers vaccines to individuals ages three through 18 pursuant to the following requirements.

The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE). This training Start Printed Page 52139program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE.

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.[] The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation.[] The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period.[] The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine.[] The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregivers accompanying the children of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate.[] These requirements are consistent with those in many States that permit licensed pharmacists to order and administer vaccines to children and permit licensed or registered pharmacy interns acting under their supervision to administer vaccines to children.[] Administering vaccinations to children age three and older is less complicated and requires less training and resources than administering vaccinations to younger children. That is because ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the deltoid muscle for individuals age three and older.[] For individuals less than three years of age, ACIP generally recommends administering intramuscular injections in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh muscle.[] Administering injections in the thigh muscle often presents additional complexities and requires additional training and resources including additional personnel to safely position the child while another healthcare professional injects the vaccine.[] Moreover, as of 2018, 40% of three-year-olds were enrolled in preprimary programs (i.e. Preschool or kindergarten programs).[] Preprimary programs are beginning in the coming weeks or months, so the Secretary has concluded that it is particularly important for individuals ages three through 18 to receive ACIP-recommended vaccines according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule.

All States require children to be vaccinated against certain communicable diseases as a condition of school attendance. These laws often apply to both public and private schools with identical immunization and exemption provisions.[] As nurseries, preschools, kindergartens, and schools reopen, increased access to childhood vaccinations is essential to ensuring children can return. Notwithstanding any State or local scope-of-practice legal requirements, (1) qualified licensed pharmacists are identified as qualified persons to order and administer ACIP-recommended vaccines and (2) qualified State-licensed or registered pharmacy interns are identified as qualified persons to administer the ACIP-recommended vaccines ordered by their supervising qualified licensed pharmacist.[] Both the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration define “covered countermeasures” to include qualified pandemic and epidemic products that “limit the harm such pandemic or epidemic might otherwise cause.” [] The troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by Start Printed Page 52140COVID-19 as set forth in Sections VI and VIII of this Declaration.[] Hence, such vaccinations are “covered countermeasures” under the PREP Act and the June 4, 2020 Second Amendment to the Declaration.

Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C. 300aa-10 et seq.

Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures. Section VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat As discussed, the troubling decrease in ACIP-recommended childhood vaccinations and the resulting increased risk of associated diseases, adverse health conditions, and other threats are categories of harms otherwise caused by COVID-19. The Secretary therefore amends section VIII, which describes the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures, to clarify that the category of disease, health condition, or threat for which he recommends the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Amendments to Declaration Amended Declaration for Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act Coverage for medical countermeasures against COVID-19.

Sections V and VIII of the March 10, 2020 Declaration under the PREP Act for medical countermeasures against COVID-19, as amended April 10, 2020 and June 4, 2020, are further amended pursuant to section 319F-3(b)(4) of the PHS Act as described below. All other sections of the Declaration remain in effect as published at 85 FR 15198 (Mar. 17, 2020) and amended at 85 FR 21012 (Apr.

15, 2020) and 85 FR 35100 (June 8, 2020). 1. Covered Persons, section V, delete in full and replace with.

V. Covered Persons 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(i)(2), (3), (4), (6), (8)(A) and (B) Covered Persons who are afforded liability immunity under this Declaration are “manufacturers,” “distributors,” “program planners,” “qualified persons,” and their officials, agents, and employees, as those terms are defined in the PREP Act, and the United States.

In addition, I have determined that the following additional persons are qualified persons. (a) Any person authorized in accordance with the public health and medical emergency response of the Authority Having Jurisdiction, as described in Section VII below, to prescribe, administer, deliver, distribute or dispense the Covered Countermeasures, and their officials, agents, employees, contractors and volunteers, following a Declaration of an emergency. (b) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense the Covered Countermeasures or who is otherwise authorized to perform an activity under an Emergency Use Authorization in accordance with Section 564 of the FD&C Act.

(c) any person authorized to prescribe, administer, or dispense Covered Countermeasures in accordance with Section 564A of the FD&C Act. And (d) a State-licensed pharmacist who orders and administers, and pharmacy interns who administer (if the pharmacy intern acts under the supervision of such pharmacist and the pharmacy intern is licensed or registered by his or her State board of pharmacy), vaccines that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends to persons ages three through 18 according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. Such State-licensed pharmacists and the State-licensed or registered interns under their supervision are qualified persons only if the following requirements are met.

The vaccine must be FDA-authorized or FDA-approved. The vaccination must be ordered and administered according to ACIP's standard immunization schedule. The licensed pharmacist must complete a practical training program of at least 20 hours that is approved by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE).

This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines. The licensed or registered pharmacy intern must complete a practical training program that is approved by the ACPE. This training program must include hands-on injection technique, clinical evaluation of indications and contraindications of vaccines, and the recognition and treatment of emergency reactions to vaccines.

The licensed pharmacist and licensed or registered pharmacy intern must have a current certificate in basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The licensed pharmacist must complete a minimum of two hours of ACPE-approved, immunization-related continuing pharmacy education during each State licensing period. The licensed pharmacist must comply with recordkeeping and reporting requirements of the jurisdiction in which he or she administers vaccines, including informing the patient's primary-care provider when available, submitting the required immunization information to the State or local immunization information system (vaccine registry), complying with requirements with respect to reporting adverse events, and complying with requirements whereby the person administering a vaccine must review the vaccine registry or other vaccination records prior to administering a vaccine.

The licensed pharmacist must inform his or her childhood-vaccination patients and the adult caregiver accompanying the child of the importance of a well-child visit with a pediatrician or other licensed primary-care provider and refer patients as appropriate. Nothing in this Declaration shall be construed to affect the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, including an injured party's ability to obtain compensation under that program. Covered countermeasures that are subject to the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program authorized under 42 U.S.C.

300aa-10 et seq. Are covered under this Declaration for the purposes of liability immunity and injury compensation only to the extent that injury compensation is not provided under that Program. All other Start Printed Page 52141terms and conditions of the Declaration apply to such covered countermeasures.

2. Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat, section VIII, delete in full and replace with. VIII.

Category of Disease, Health Condition, or Threat 42 U.S.C. 247d-6d(b)(2)(A) The category of disease, health condition, or threat for which I recommend the administration or use of the Covered Countermeasures is not only COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 or a virus mutating therefrom, but also other diseases, health conditions, or threats that may have been caused by COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, or a virus mutating therefrom, including the decrease in the rate of childhood immunizations, which will lead to an increase in the rate of infectious diseases. Start Authority 42 U.S.C.

247d-6d. End Authority Start Signature Dated. August 19, 2020.

Alex M. Azar II, Secretary of Health and Human Services. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc.

2020-18542 Filed 8-20-20. 4:15 pm]BILLING CODE 4150-03-PToday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services released Healthy People 2030, the nation's 10-year plan for addressing our most critical public health priorities and challenges.

Since 1980, HHS's Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion has set measurable objectives and targets to improve the health and well-being of the nation.This decade, Healthy People 2030 features 355 core – or measurable – objectives with 10-year targets, new objectives related to opioid use disorder and youth e-cigarette use, and resources for adapting Healthy People 2030 to emerging public health threats like COVID-19. For the first time, Healthy People 2030 also sets 10-year targets for objectives related to social determinants of health."Healthy People was the first national effort to lay out a set of data-driven priorities for health improvement," said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. "Healthy People 2030 adopts a more focused set of objectives and more rigorous data standards to help the federal government and all of our partners deliver results on these important goals over the next decade."Healthy People has led the nation with its focus on social determinants of health, and continues to prioritize economic stability, education access and quality, health care access and quality, neighborhood and built environment, and social and community context as factors that influence health.

Healthy People 2030 also continues to prioritize health disparities, health equity, and health literacy."Now more than ever, we need programs like Healthy People that set a shared vision for a healthier nation, where all people can achieve their full potential for health and well-being across the lifespan," said ADM Brett P. Giroir, MD, Assistant Secretary for Health. "COVID-19 has brought the importance of public health to the forefront of our national dialogue.

Achieving Healthy People 2030's vision would help the United States become more resilient to public health threats like COVID-19."Healthy People 2030 emphasizes collaboration, with objectives and targets that span multiple sectors. A federal advisory committee of 13 external thought leaders and a workgroup of subject matter experts from more than 20 federal agencies contributed to Healthy People 2030, along with public comments received throughout the development process.The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion leads Healthy People in partnership with the National Center for Health Statistics at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which oversees data in support of the initiative.HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar II, ADM Brett P.

Giroir, MD, Assistant Secretary for Health, and U.S. Surgeon General Jerome M. Adams, MD, MPH, and others from HHS and CDC will launch Healthy People 2030 during a webcast on August 18 at 1 pm (EDT) at https://www.hhs.gov/live.

No registration is necessary. For more information about Healthy People 2030, visit https://healthypeople.gov..

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Krogue, who also teaches nursing at Montana State University’s Great Falls campus, has seen attendance in his classes dwindle as students fall ill or quarantine.“I was just scared that I’m not going to be able to see it through, that I’m going to lasix 20mg get sick,” said Paul Krogue, the jail’s medical director.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesOne place where the infections have spread has been local jails, which are confined, often crowded spaces. Jails are staples of local communities and tend to have people coming and going more quickly than prisons. Jails can hold everyone from people awaiting criminal trials for months to those picked up for a suspended driver’s license for a few hours. With so many people filtering in and out, jails pose extra risks for the virus’s spread — not only inside facilities but in potentially feeding outbreaks in the rest of the community.Nationally, jails and prisons have seen disproportionate rates of infection and death, with a mortality rate twice as high lasix 20mg as in the general population and an infection rate more than four times as high, according to recent data. #styln-briefing-block { font-family.

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100%. } } Latest Updates. The Coronavirus Outbreak 2m ago A court rules that a California prison ravaged by the virus must transfer inmates to protect them. 7m ago Big Ten’s football debut raises concerns for local mayors. 27m ago Cuomo will ease restrictions in some N.Y.C.

Virus hot spots. See more updates More live coverage. Markets A New York Times database has tracked clusters of at least 50 coronavirus cases in a dozen rural jails in Montana, Idaho, Utah and New Mexico during the pandemic. Among them. The Purgatory Correctional Center in Hurricane, Utah, with 166 infections.

The jail in Twin Falls, Idaho, with 279. And, in New Mexico, the Cibola County Correctional Center, which has reported 357 cases.In Cascade County, infections at the jail make up about a quarter of all known virus cases in the county. Health authorities say that the jail’s outbreak, which began in mid-August, was not believed to be the main cause of the community’s recent surge, but that it had led to some cases. In the past two months, Mr. Krogue said, the jail released 29 people who were considered actively infected.Infections at the jail make up about a quarter of Cascade County’s known virus cases.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesGreat Falls, home to about 58,000 residents, is in the less mountainous part of Montana, with the Missouri River flowing through and a large oil refinery on its banks.

The Cascade County Detention Center sits along a highway at the edge of town. Drive five miles in any direction and you are surrounded by wide-open plains.Montana requires that masks be worn inside businesses and indoor public spaces, and many people in Great Falls wear them when walking around downtown’s Central Avenue, where shops and cafes are still recovering from shutting down in the spring. Others go without masks, citing the open space and lack of crowds.Bob Kelly, the mayor, said people had not been overly worried about how the jail outbreak might affect the rest of town when it started.“I think that by the very definition of a jail, hopefully, the disease will be incarcerated, as well as the patients,” he said. €œIs there concern?. Sure, there’s concern.

But is there overreaction?. No.”The mayor of Great Falls said that residents had considered the jail’s outbreak a distant concern at first.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesSome residents’ nonchalance about the risks of the virus, said Mr. Krogue, the jail’s medical director, can be traced to a spring and early summer when almost no one in Cascade County knew anyone who had been sickened.“We benefited from that early on,” he said. €œBut in some ways, I think it did us a disservice, too, because it also created a certain level of complacency.”That has quickly shifted now, he said, as cases have spiked.The number of active cases known to county officials on any given day has risen sharply to about 600, according to Trisha Gardner, Cascade County’s health officer. The county has seen 1,261 cases and six deaths during the pandemic, a Times database shows.

Some of the cases have been tied to the jail outbreak, she said, and others have been connected to bars and restaurants. Even figuring out what has led to some cases has been complex, she said, as residents have been reluctant to cooperate with contact tracers.“Our hospitals are at capacity, our public health system is at capacity,” she said. €œIt’s not sustainable at this rate.”When the outbreak at the jail began, social distancing was impossible, the authorities said. Three inmates shared cells designed for two. At night, men slept on thin blue pads in every available space.

On the floor in the day room, in shower stalls, in stairwells, in hallways outside of cells.Inmates did not receive masks until August, and jail officials said many have refused to wear them.In interviews with more than a dozen inmates and their family members, inmates described the jail during the outbreak as chaotic and unsanitary. They said their pleas for help often went unanswered by nurses and guards.Newly arriving inmates were not always quarantined from one another before their test results were known because of a lack of space, inmates and jail officials said.Owen Hawley, 30, said every inmate in his living area of 38 men had tested positive for the virus. He said he had been unable to eat for three days, had intensive body aches and suffered from a headache so powerful it felt as if it was “behind my eyes.”“After the fourth day of like, not eating and stuff, I just shut off, you know?. € he said.A jail area set aside for quarantining new inmates.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesAt one point, Mr. Hawley said, he and other prisoners protested the way the virus was being handled by refusing to leave their living areas and by blocking new inmates from entering.

Everyone was ultimately tested, Mr. Hawley said, and each prisoner was given a disposable mask.Sierra Jasmine Wells, 25, another inmate, said women in her dormitory had grown ill, one after the next.“Everyone around me was getting sick and it was tough on me,” she said. €œBy then, I had already accepted the fact that I was going to get sick.”When she became infected, she said, she was given cough syrup and Tylenol.“I kind of was just left alone to deal with it,” she said.Jesse Slaughter, the county sheriff who oversees the jail, said that the jail’s medical staff was doing everything it could, and that he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties. Officials defended their handling of the outbreak, noting that all inmates received standard medications including Tylenol twice a day and were taken to area hospitals when they needed added care. Seven inmates, as well as some staff members, were hospitalized.

No one from the jail has died from the virus, officials said.Sheriff Jesse Slaughter, who oversees the jail, said he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesMr. Krogue said that since the start of the outbreak he had been working up to 16 hours each day and sleeping in his basement, away from his wife and children. He remains healthy but says he fears bringing the virus home. The virus has slowed some in the jail, and officials have moved some inmates to other facilities, but other prisons and jails in the state are now seeing outbreaks.“You can start to see what some of these other places experienced much earlier on, and we just didn’t have that experience, but it’s certainly happening now,” Mr. Krogue said.

€œIt’s just real in a way that it wasn’t.”Lucy Tompkins reported from Great Falls, Maura Turcotte from Chicago and Libby Seline from Lincoln, Neb. Reporting was contributed by Izzy Colón from Columbia, Mo., Brendon Derr from Phoenix, Rebecca Griesbach from Tuscaloosa, Ala., Danya Issawi and Timothy Williams from New York, Ann Hinga Klein from Des Moines, K.B. Mensah from Silver Spring, Md., and Mitch Smith from Chicago.Start Preamble Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. Notice of funding opportunity. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency Start Printed Page 63654has had a significant impact on transit operations.

During a series of FTA listening sessions held over the last three months, transit agencies asked FTA to support research to identify solutions to address the operational challenges that they are facing as a result of COVID-19. In response, FTA makes available through this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) funding to support research demonstration grants to public transit agencies to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Demonstration grants under this NOFO are authorized under FTA's Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312). Eligible projects will demonstrate innovative solutions to improve the operational efficiencies of transit systems and enhance mobility for their communities in four major areas.

(1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit services. The total funding available for awards under this NOFO is $10,000,000.

FTA may supplement this amount if additional funding becomes available. Applicants must submit completed proposals for funding opportunity FTA-2020-015-TRI through the GRANTS.GOV “APPLY” function by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 2, 2020. Prospective applicants should register as soon as possible on the GRANTS.GOV website to ensure they can complete the application process before the submission deadline. Application instructions are available on FTA's website at http://transit.dot.gov/​howtoapply and in the “FIND” module of GRANTS.GOV.

FTA will not accept mail and fax submissions. Start Further Info Please send any questions on this notice to Jamel El-Hamri email. Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 2020-366-8985. A Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) is available for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing at 1-800-877-8339.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Table of Contents A. Program Description B. Federal Award Information C. Eligibility Information D. Application and Submission Information E.

Application Review Information F. Federal Award Administration Information G. Federal Awarding Agency Contact Information A. Program Description The Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program is funded through the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312), with the goal to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Eligible projects will propose to develop and deploy innovative solutions in four major areas. (1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit.

As required by 49 U.S.C. 5312(e)(4), projects funded under this NOFO must participate in an evaluation by an independent outside entity that will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the success or failure of the projects funded under this subsection and any plan for broad-based implementation of the innovation promoted by successful projects. B. Federal Award Information FTA makes available $10,000,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2020 funds under the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312) to finance the Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program.

FTA may supplement the total funds available if additional funding becomes available at the time project selections are made. FTA will grant pre-award authority starting on the date of the project award announcement for selected projects and should be completed within 24 months from the date of award. Funds are available only for eligible expenses incurred after the announcement of project selections. C. Eligibility Information (1) Eligible Applicants Eligible applicants include State and local governmental authorities, direct recipients of Urbanized Area (49 U.S.C.

5307) and Rural Area (49 U.S.C. 5311) formula funds, and Indian tribes. Eligible applicants are limited to FTA grantees or subrecipients who would be the primary beneficiaries of the innovative products and services that are developed—typically public transit agencies. Except for projects proposed by Indian tribes, proposals for projects in rural (non-urbanized) areas must be submitted as part of a consolidated State proposal. States and other eligible applicants also may submit consolidated proposals for projects in urbanized areas.

The submission of the Statewide application will not preclude the submission and consideration of any application from other eligible recipients in an urbanized area in a State. Proposals may contain projects to be implemented by the recipient or its subrecipients. Eligible subrecipients include public agencies, private nonprofit organizations, and private providers engaged in public transportation. Eligible applicants may submit consolidated proposals for projects. (2) Cost Sharing or Matching The maximum Federal share of project costs is 100 percent.

FTA may give additional consideration to applicants that propose a local share and may view these applicants as more competitive. The applicant must document the source(s) of the local match, if any, in the grant application. For any applicants proposing match, eligible local match sources include the following. Cash from non-Government sources other than revenues from providing public transportation services. Revenues derived from the sale of advertising and concessions.

Revenues generated from value capture financing mechanisms. Funds from an undistributed cash surplus. Replacement or depreciation cash fund or reserve. New capital. Or in-kind contributions.

(3) Eligible Projects Eligible projects will propose innovative solutions to improve operational efficiencies of transit agencies and enhance the mobility of transit users, through projects that demonstrate innovative solutions for. Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. Exposure mitigation measures such a real-time notification of rail and bus passenger loads. New multi-modal payment innovative mobility systems such as contactless payments. And measures that strengthen public confidence in transit.

Each applicant may only submit one proposal.Start Printed Page 63655 D. Application and Submission Information (1) Address and Form of Application Submission Applications must be submitted through GRANTS.GOV. Applicants can find general information for submitting applications through GRANTS.GOV at www.fta.dot.gov/​howtoapply, along with specific instructions for the forms and attachments required for submission. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted. (2) Content and Form of Application Submission a.

Proposal Submission A complete proposal submission consists of at least two forms. 1. The SF-424 Mandatory Form (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV) and 2. The supplemental form for the FY 2020 COVID-19 Demonstration Program (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV), which is available on FTA's website at (placeholder for FTA COVID-19 Demonstration Program). The application must include responses to all sections of the SF-424 mandatory form and the supplemental form unless a section is indicated as optional.

FTA will use the information on the supplemental form to determine applicant and project eligibility for the program and to evaluate the proposal against the selection criteria described in part E of this notice. FTA will accept only one supplemental form per SF-424 submission. FTA encourages applicants to consider submitting a single supplemental form that includes multiple activities to be evaluated as a consolidated proposal. Applicants may attach additional supporting information to the SF-424 submission, including but not limited to letters of support, project budgets, or excerpts from relevant planning documents. Supporting documentation must be described and referenced by file name in the appropriate response section of the supplemental form, or it may not be reviewed.

Information such as applicant name, Federal amount requested, local match amount, description of areas served, etc., may be requested in varying degrees of detail on both the SF-424 form and supplemental form. Applicants must fill in all fields unless stated otherwise on the forms. If applicants copy information into the supplemental form from another source, they should verify that the supplemental form has fully captured pasted text and that it has not truncated the text due to character limits built into the form. Applicants should use both the “Check Package for Errors” and the “Validate Form” validation buttons on both forms to check all required fields. Applicants should also ensure that the Federal and local amounts specified are consistent.

Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage. Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department encourages applicants to consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. B. Application Content The SF-424 Mandatory Form and the supplemental form will prompt applicants for the required information, including.

I. Applicant Name ii. Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number iii. Key contact information (contact name, address, email address, and phone number) iv. Congressional district(s) where project will take place v.

Project Information (title, executive summary, and type) vi. A detailed description of the need for the project vii. A detailed description of how the project will support the Program objectives viii. Evidence that the applicant can provide the local cost shares ix. A description of the technical, legal, and financial capacity of the applicant x.

A detailed project budget xi. Details on the local matching funds xii. A detailed project timeline xiii. Whether the project impacts an Opportunity Zone (3) Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) Each applicant is required to. (1) Be registered in SAM before submitting an application.

(2) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application. And (3) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which the applicant has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by FTA. These requirements do not apply if the applicant. (1) Is excepted from the requirements under 2 CFR 25.110(b) or (c). Or (2) has an exception approved by FTA under 2 CFR 25.110(d).

FTA may not make an award until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements. If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time FTA is ready to make an award, FTA may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. All applicants must provide a unique entity identifier provided by SAM. Registration in SAM may take as little as 3-5 business days, but there can be unexpected steps or delays. For example, the applicant may need to obtain an Employer Identification Number.

FTA recommends allowing ample time, up to several weeks, to complete all steps. For additional information on obtaining a unique entity identifier, please visit www.sam.gov. (4) Submission Dates and Times Project proposals must be submitted electronically through GRANTS.GOV by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on November 2, 2020. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted.

FTA urges applicants to submit applications at least 72 hours prior to the due date to allow time to correct any problems that may have caused either GRANTS.GOV or FTA systems to reject the submission. Proposals submitted after the deadline will only be considered under extraordinary circumstances not within the applicant's control. Deadlines will not be extended due to scheduled website maintenance. GRANTS.GOV scheduled maintenance and outage times are announced on the GRANTS.GOV website. Within 48 hours after submitting an electronic application, the applicant should receive two email messages from GRANTS.GOV.

(1) Confirmation of successful transmission to GRANTS.GOV. And (2) confirmation of successful validation by GRANTS.GOV. If the applicant does not receive confirmation of successful validation or receives a notice of failed validation or incomplete materials, the applicant must address the reason for the failed validation, as described in the email notice, and resubmit before the submission deadline. If making a resubmission for any reason, applicants must include all original attachments regardless of which attachments were updated and check the box on the supplemental form indicating this is a resubmission. Applicants are encouraged to begin the process of registration on the GRANTS.GOV site well in advance of the submission deadline.

Registration is Start Printed Page 63656a multi-step process, which may take several weeks to complete before an application can be submitted. Registered applicants may still be required to update their registration before submitting an application. Registration in SAM is renewed annually and persons making submissions on behalf of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) must be authorized in GRANTS.GOV by the AOR to make submissions. (5) Funding Restrictions Funds may be used for post-award expenditures only. Funds under this NOFO cannot be used to reimburse projects for otherwise eligible expenses incurred prior to the date of project award announcements.

(6) Other Submission Requirements FTA encourages applicants to identify scaled funding options in case insufficient funding is available to fund a project at the full requested amount. If an applicant indicates that a project is scalable, the applicant must provide an appropriate minimum funding amount that will fund an eligible project that achieves the objectives of the program and meets all relevant program requirements. The applicant must provide a clear explanation of how a reduced award would affect the project budget and scope. FTA may award a lesser amount whether or not the applicant provides a scalable option. E.

Application Review Information (1) Project Evaluation Criteria Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage. Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department will consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. In addition, the Department will review and consider applications for funding pursuant to this Notice in accordance with the President's September 2, 2020 memorandum, entitled Memorandum on Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients of Federal Funds that Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities, consistent with guidance from the Office of Management and Budget and the Attorney General and with all applicable laws. FTA will evaluate proposals submitted according to the following criteria.

(a) Project Innovation and Impact. (b) Project Approach. (c) National Applicability. (d) Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer. And (e) Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity.

FTA encourages each applicant to demonstrate how a project supports all criteria with the most relevant information the applicant can provide, regardless of whether such information has been specifically requested or identified in this notice. A. Project Innovation and Impact i. Effectiveness of the project in achieving and demonstrating the specific objectives of this program. Ii.

Demonstration of benefits in addressing the needs of the transit agency and industry and impacts to infrastructure, equipment, transit workforce, and riders. Iii. Degree of improvement over current and existing technologies, designs, and/or practices applicable to the transit industry. B. Project Approach i.

Quality of the project approach such as existing partnerships, collaboration strategies and level of commitment of the project partners. Ii. Proposal is realistic in its approach to fulfill the milestones/deliverables, schedule and goals. C. National Applicability i.

Degree to which the project could be replicated by other transit agencies regionally or nationally. Ii. Ability to evaluate technologies, designs and/or practices in a wide variety of conditions and locales. Iii. Degree to which the technology, designs and/or practices can be replicated by other transportation modes.

D. Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer i. Demonstrates a realistic plan for moving the results of the project into the transit marketplace (patents, conferences, articles in trade magazines, webinar, site visits, etc.). Ii. How the project team plans to work with the industry on improving best practices, guidance and/or standards, if applicable.

Iii. Demonstrate a clear understanding and robust approach to data collection, access and management. E. Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity Capacity of the applicant and any partners to successfully execute the project effort. There should be no outstanding legal, technical, or financial issues with the applicant that would make this a high-risk project.

(2) Review and Selection Process An FTA technical evaluation committee will evaluate proposals based on the published project evaluation criteria. Members of the technical evaluation committee will rate the applications and may seek clarification about any statement in an application. The FTA Administrator will determine the final selection and amount of funding for each project after consideration of the findings of the technical evaluation committee. Geographic diversity, diversity of the project type, the amount of local match to be provided, and the applicant's receipt and management of other Federal transit funds may be considered in FTA's award decisions. Prior fare payment innovation efforts may receive priority consideration.

The FTA Administrator will consider the following key DOT objectives. A. Utilizing alternative funding sources and innovative financing models to attract non-Federal sources of investment. B. Whether the project is located in or supports public transportation service in a qualified opportunity zone designated pursuant to 26.U.S.C.

1400Z-1. And c. The extent to which the project addresses challenges specific to the provision of rural public transportation. (3) FAPIIS Review Prior to making a grant award, FTA is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) accessible through SAM. An applicant may review and comment on information about itself that a Federal awarding agency previously entered.

FTA will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR 200.205 Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants. F. Federal Award Administration Information (1) Federal Award Notices FTA will announce the final project selections on the FTA website. Project recipients should contact their FTA Regional Office for additional information regarding allocations for Start Printed Page 63657projects. At the time project selections are announced, FTA will extend pre-award authority for the selected projects.

There is no blanket pre-award authority for these projects before announcement. There is no minimum or maximum grant award amount, but FTA intends to fund as many meritorious projects as possible. FTA only will consider proposals from eligible recipients for eligible activities. Due to funding limitations, projects selected for funding may receive less than the amount originally requested. In those cases, applicants must be able to demonstrate that the proposed projects are still viable and can be completed with the amount awarded.

(2) Administrative and National Policy Requirements a. Pre-Award Authority FTA will issue specific guidance to recipients regarding pre-award authority at the time of selection. FTA does not provide pre-award authority for competitive funds until projects are selected, and there are Federal requirements that must be met before costs are incurred. For more information about FTA's policy on pre-award authority, see the FY 2020 Apportionments Notice published on June 3, 2020, at https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2020-06-03/​pdf/​2020-11946.pdf. b.

Grant Requirements Selected applicants will submit a grant application through FTA's electronic grant management system and adhere to the customary FTA grant requirements for research project (insert Circular name). All competitive grants, regardless of award amount, will be subject to the Congressional notification and release process. FTA emphasizes that third-party procurement applies to all funding awards, as described in FTA Circular 4220.1F, “Third Party Contracting Guidance.” However, FTA may approve applications that include a specifically identified partnering organization(s) (2 CFR 200.302(f)). When included, the application, budget, and budget narrative should provide a clear understanding of how the selection of these organizations is critical for the project and give sufficient detail about the costs involved. C.

Planning FTA encourages applicants to engage the appropriate State Departments of Transportation, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, or Metropolitan Planning Organizations in areas to be served by the project funds available under this program. D. Standard Assurances The applicant assures that it will comply with all applicable Federal statutes, regulations, executive orders, FTA circulars, and other Federal administrative requirements in carrying out any project supported by the FTA grant. The applicant acknowledges that it is under a continuing obligation to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement issued for its project with FTA. The applicant understands that Federal laws, regulations, policies, and administrative practices might be modified from time to time and may affect the implementation of the project.

The applicant agrees that the most recent Federal requirements will apply to the project unless FTA issues a written determination otherwise. The applicant must submit the Certifications and Assurances before receiving a grant if it does not have current certifications on file. E. Free Speech and Religious Liberty In connection with any program or activity conducted with or benefiting from funds awarded under this notice, recipients of funds must comply with all applicable requirements of Federal law, including, without limitation, the Constitution of the United States.

With so many people filtering in and out, order lasix overnight delivery jails pose extra risks for the virus’s spread — not only inside facilities but in potentially feeding outbreaks in the rest of the community.Nationally, jails and prisons have seen disproportionate rates of infection and death, with a mortality rate twice as high as in the general population and an infection rate more than four times as high, according to recent data. #styln-briefing-block { font-family. Nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif.

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} } Latest Updates. The Coronavirus Outbreak 2m ago A court rules that a California prison ravaged by the virus must transfer inmates to protect them. 7m ago Big Ten’s football debut raises concerns for local mayors.

27m ago Cuomo will ease restrictions in some N.Y.C. Virus hot spots. See more updates More live coverage.

Markets A New York Times database has tracked clusters of at least 50 coronavirus cases in a dozen rural jails in Montana, Idaho, Utah and New Mexico during the pandemic. Among them. The Purgatory Correctional Center in Hurricane, Utah, with 166 infections.

The jail in Twin Falls, Idaho, with 279. And, in New Mexico, the Cibola County Correctional Center, which has reported 357 cases.In Cascade County, infections at the jail make up about a quarter of all known virus cases in the county. Health authorities say that the jail’s outbreak, which began in mid-August, was not believed to be the main cause of the community’s recent surge, but that it had led to some cases.

In the past two months, Mr. Krogue said, the jail released 29 people who were considered actively infected.Infections at the jail make up about a quarter of Cascade County’s known virus cases.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesGreat Falls, home to about 58,000 residents, is in the less mountainous part of Montana, with the Missouri River flowing through and a large oil refinery on its banks. The Cascade County Detention Center sits along a highway at the edge of town.

Drive five miles in any direction and you are surrounded by wide-open plains.Montana requires that masks be worn inside businesses and indoor public spaces, and many people in Great Falls wear them when walking around downtown’s Central Avenue, where shops and cafes are still recovering from shutting down in the spring. Others go without masks, citing the open space and lack of crowds.Bob Kelly, the mayor, said people had not been overly worried about how the jail outbreak might affect the rest of town when it started.“I think that by the very definition of a jail, hopefully, the disease will be incarcerated, as well as the patients,” he said. €œIs there concern?.

Sure, there’s concern. But is there overreaction?. No.”The mayor of Great Falls said that residents had considered the jail’s outbreak a distant concern at first.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesSome residents’ nonchalance about the risks of the virus, said Mr.

Krogue, the jail’s medical director, can be traced to a spring and early summer when almost no one in Cascade County knew anyone who had been sickened.“We benefited from that early on,” he said. €œBut in some ways, I think it did us a disservice, too, because it also created a certain level of complacency.”That has quickly shifted now, he said, as cases have spiked.The number of active cases known to county officials on any given day has risen sharply to about 600, according to Trisha Gardner, Cascade County’s health officer. The county has seen 1,261 cases and six deaths during the pandemic, a Times database shows.

Some of the cases have been tied to the jail outbreak, she said, and others have been connected to bars and restaurants. Even figuring out what has led to some cases has been complex, she said, as residents have been reluctant to cooperate with contact tracers.“Our hospitals are at capacity, our public health system is at capacity,” she said. €œIt’s not sustainable at this rate.”When the outbreak at the jail began, social distancing was impossible, the authorities said.

Three inmates shared cells designed for two. At night, men slept on thin blue pads in every available space. On the floor in the day room, in shower stalls, in stairwells, in hallways outside of cells.Inmates did not receive masks until August, and jail officials said many have refused to wear them.In interviews with more than a dozen inmates and their family members, inmates described the jail during the outbreak as chaotic and unsanitary.

They said their pleas for help often went unanswered by nurses and guards.Newly arriving inmates were not always quarantined from one another before their test results were known because of a lack of space, inmates and jail officials said.Owen Hawley, 30, said every inmate in his living area of 38 men had tested positive for the virus. He said he had been unable to eat for three days, had intensive body aches and suffered from a headache so powerful it felt as if it was “behind my eyes.”“After the fourth day of like, not eating and stuff, I just shut off, you know?. € he said.A jail area set aside for quarantining new inmates.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesAt one point, Mr.

Hawley said, he and other prisoners protested the way the virus was being handled by refusing to leave their living areas and by blocking new inmates from entering. Everyone was ultimately tested, Mr. Hawley said, and each prisoner was given a disposable mask.Sierra Jasmine Wells, 25, another inmate, said women in her dormitory had grown ill, one after the next.“Everyone around me was getting sick and it was tough on me,” she said.

€œBy then, I had already accepted the fact that I was going to get sick.”When she became infected, she said, she was given cough syrup and Tylenol.“I kind of was just left alone to deal with it,” she said.Jesse Slaughter, the county sheriff who oversees the jail, said that the jail’s medical staff was doing everything it could, and that he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties. Officials defended their handling of the outbreak, noting that all inmates received standard medications including Tylenol twice a day and were taken to area hospitals when they needed added care. Seven inmates, as well as some staff members, were hospitalized.

No one from the jail has died from the virus, officials said.Sheriff Jesse Slaughter, who oversees the jail, said he had been seeking health care assistance from other counties.Credit...Tailyr Irvine for The New York TimesMr. Krogue said that since the start of the outbreak he had been working up to 16 hours each day and sleeping in his basement, away from his wife and children. He remains healthy but says he fears bringing the virus home.

The virus has slowed some in the jail, and officials have moved some inmates to other facilities, but other prisons and jails in the state are now seeing outbreaks.“You can start to see what some of these other places experienced much earlier on, and we just didn’t have that experience, but it’s certainly happening now,” Mr. Krogue said. €œIt’s just real in a way that it wasn’t.”Lucy Tompkins reported from Great Falls, Maura Turcotte from Chicago and Libby Seline from Lincoln, Neb.

Reporting was contributed by Izzy Colón from Columbia, Mo., Brendon Derr from Phoenix, Rebecca Griesbach from Tuscaloosa, Ala., Danya Issawi and Timothy Williams from New York, Ann Hinga Klein from Des Moines, K.B. Mensah from Silver Spring, Md., and Mitch Smith from Chicago.Start Preamble Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. Notice of funding opportunity.

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health emergency Start Printed Page 63654has had a significant impact on transit operations. During a series of FTA listening sessions held over the last three months, transit agencies asked FTA to support research to identify solutions to address the operational challenges that they are facing as a result of COVID-19. In response, FTA makes available through this Notice of Funding Opportunity (NOFO) funding to support research demonstration grants to public transit agencies to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Demonstration grants under this NOFO are authorized under FTA's Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312). Eligible projects will demonstrate innovative solutions to improve the operational efficiencies of transit systems and enhance mobility for their communities in four major areas.

(1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. (2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments.

And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit services. The total funding available for awards under this NOFO is $10,000,000. FTA may supplement this amount if additional funding becomes available.

Applicants must submit completed proposals for funding opportunity FTA-2020-015-TRI through the GRANTS.GOV “APPLY” function by 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time on November 2, 2020. Prospective applicants should register as soon as possible on the GRANTS.GOV website to ensure they can complete the application process before the submission deadline.

Application instructions are available on FTA's website at http://transit.dot.gov/​howtoapply and in the “FIND” module of GRANTS.GOV. FTA will not accept mail and fax submissions. Start Further Info Please send any questions on this notice to Jamel El-Hamri email.

Jamel.El-Hamri@dot.gov phone. 2020-366-8985. A Telecommunication Device for the Deaf (TDD) is available for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing at 1-800-877-8339.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Table of Contents A. Program Description B. Federal Award Information C.

Eligibility Information D. Application and Submission Information E. Application Review Information F.

Federal Award Administration Information G. Federal Awarding Agency Contact Information A. Program Description The Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program is funded through the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C.

5312), with the goal to develop, deploy, and demonstrate innovative solutions that improve the operational efficiency of transit agencies, as well as enhance the mobility of transit users affected by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Eligible projects will propose to develop and deploy innovative solutions in four major areas. (1) Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection.

(2) exposure mitigation measures. (3) innovative mobility such as contactless payments. And (4) measures that strengthen public confidence in transit.

As required by 49 U.S.C. 5312(e)(4), projects funded under this NOFO must participate in an evaluation by an independent outside entity that will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the success or failure of the projects funded under this subsection and any plan for broad-based implementation of the innovation promoted by successful projects. B.

Federal Award Information FTA makes available $10,000,000 in fiscal year (FY) 2020 funds under the Public Transportation Innovation Program (49 U.S.C. 5312) to finance the Public Transportation COVID-19 Research Demonstration Grant Program. FTA may supplement the total funds available if additional funding becomes available at the time project selections are made.

FTA will grant pre-award authority starting on the date of the project award announcement for selected projects and should be completed within 24 months from the date of award. Funds are available only for eligible expenses incurred after the announcement of project selections. C.

Eligibility Information (1) Eligible Applicants Eligible applicants include State and local governmental authorities, direct recipients of Urbanized Area (49 U.S.C. 5307) and Rural Area (49 U.S.C. 5311) formula funds, and Indian tribes.

Eligible applicants are limited to FTA grantees or subrecipients who would be the primary beneficiaries of the innovative products and services that are developed—typically public transit agencies. Except for projects proposed by Indian tribes, proposals for projects in rural (non-urbanized) areas must be submitted as part of a consolidated State proposal. States and other eligible applicants also may submit consolidated proposals for projects in urbanized areas.

The submission of the Statewide application will not preclude the submission and consideration of any application from other eligible recipients in an urbanized area in a State. Proposals may contain projects to be implemented by the recipient or its subrecipients. Eligible subrecipients include public agencies, private nonprofit organizations, and private providers engaged in public transportation.

Eligible applicants may submit consolidated proposals for projects. (2) Cost Sharing or Matching The maximum Federal share of project costs is 100 percent. FTA may give additional consideration to applicants that propose a local share and may view these applicants as more competitive.

The applicant must document the source(s) of the local match, if any, in the grant application. For any applicants proposing match, eligible local match sources include the following. Cash from non-Government sources other than revenues from providing public transportation services.

Revenues derived from the sale of advertising and concessions. Revenues generated from value capture financing mechanisms. Funds from an undistributed cash surplus.

Replacement or depreciation cash fund or reserve. New capital. Or in-kind contributions.

(3) Eligible Projects Eligible projects will propose innovative solutions to improve operational efficiencies of transit agencies and enhance the mobility of transit users, through projects that demonstrate innovative solutions for. Vehicle, facility, equipment and infrastructure cleaning and disinfection. Exposure mitigation measures such a real-time notification of rail and bus passenger loads.

New multi-modal payment innovative mobility systems such as contactless payments. And measures that strengthen public confidence in transit. Each applicant may only submit one proposal.Start Printed Page 63655 D.

Application and Submission Information (1) Address and Form of Application Submission Applications must be submitted through GRANTS.GOV. Applicants can find general information for submitting applications through GRANTS.GOV at www.fta.dot.gov/​howtoapply, along with specific instructions for the forms and attachments required for submission. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted.

(2) Content and Form of Application Submission a. Proposal Submission A complete proposal submission consists of at least two forms. 1.

The SF-424 Mandatory Form (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV) and 2. The supplemental form for the FY 2020 COVID-19 Demonstration Program (downloadable from GRANTS.GOV), which is available on FTA's website at (placeholder for FTA COVID-19 Demonstration Program). The application must include responses to all sections of the SF-424 mandatory form and the supplemental form unless a section is indicated as optional.

FTA will use the information on the supplemental form to determine applicant and project eligibility for the program and to evaluate the proposal against the selection criteria described in part E of this notice. FTA will accept only one supplemental form per SF-424 submission. FTA encourages applicants to consider submitting a single supplemental form that includes multiple activities to be evaluated as a consolidated proposal.

Applicants may attach additional supporting information to the SF-424 submission, including but not limited to letters of support, project budgets, or excerpts from relevant planning documents. Supporting documentation must be described and referenced by file name in the appropriate response section of the supplemental form, or it may not be reviewed. Information such as applicant name, Federal amount requested, local match amount, description of areas served, etc., may be requested in varying degrees of detail on both the SF-424 form and supplemental form.

Applicants must fill in all fields unless stated otherwise on the forms. If applicants copy information into the supplemental form from another source, they should verify that the supplemental form has fully captured pasted text and that it has not truncated the text due to character limits built into the form. Applicants should use both the “Check Package for Errors” and the “Validate Form” validation buttons on both forms to check all required fields.

Applicants should also ensure that the Federal and local amounts specified are consistent. Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage. Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S.

Initiative, the Department encourages applicants to consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. B. Application Content The SF-424 Mandatory Form and the supplemental form will prompt applicants for the required information, including.

I. Applicant Name ii. Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number iii.

Key contact information (contact name, address, email address, and phone number) iv. Congressional district(s) where project will take place v. Project Information (title, executive summary, and type) vi.

A detailed description of the need for the project vii. A detailed description of how the project will support the Program objectives viii. Evidence that the applicant can provide the local cost shares ix.

A description of the technical, legal, and financial capacity of the applicant x. A detailed project budget xi. Details on the local matching funds xii.

A detailed project timeline xiii. Whether the project impacts an Opportunity Zone (3) Unique Entity Identifier and System for Award Management (SAM) Each applicant is required to. (1) Be registered in SAM before submitting an application.

(2) provide a valid unique entity identifier in its application. And (3) continue to maintain an active SAM registration with current information at all times during which the applicant has an active Federal award or an application or plan under consideration by FTA. These requirements do not apply if the applicant.

(1) Is excepted from the requirements under 2 CFR 25.110(b) or (c). Or (2) has an exception approved by FTA under 2 CFR 25.110(d). FTA may not make an award until the applicant has complied with all applicable unique entity identifier and SAM requirements.

If an applicant has not fully complied with the requirements by the time FTA is ready to make an award, FTA may determine that the applicant is not qualified to receive an award and use that determination as a basis for making a Federal award to another applicant. All applicants must provide a unique entity identifier provided by SAM. Registration in SAM may take as little as 3-5 business days, but there can be unexpected steps or delays.

For example, the applicant may need to obtain an Employer Identification Number. FTA recommends allowing ample time, up to several weeks, to complete all steps. For additional information on obtaining a unique entity identifier, please visit www.sam.gov.

(4) Submission Dates and Times Project proposals must be submitted electronically through GRANTS.GOV by 11:59 p.m. Eastern on November 2, 2020. Mail and fax submissions will not be accepted.

FTA urges applicants to submit applications at least 72 hours prior to the due date to allow time to correct any problems that may have caused either GRANTS.GOV or FTA systems to reject the submission. Proposals submitted after the deadline will only be considered under extraordinary circumstances not within the applicant's control. Deadlines will not be extended due to scheduled website maintenance.

GRANTS.GOV scheduled maintenance and outage times are announced on the GRANTS.GOV website. Within 48 hours after submitting an electronic application, the applicant should receive two email messages from GRANTS.GOV. (1) Confirmation of successful transmission to GRANTS.GOV.

And (2) confirmation of successful validation by GRANTS.GOV. If the applicant does not receive confirmation of successful validation or receives a notice of failed validation or incomplete materials, the applicant must address the reason for the failed validation, as described in the email notice, and resubmit before the submission deadline. If making a resubmission for any reason, applicants must include all original attachments regardless of which attachments were updated and check the box on the supplemental form indicating this is a resubmission.

Applicants are encouraged to begin the process of registration on the GRANTS.GOV site well in advance of the submission deadline. Registration is Start Printed Page 63656a multi-step process, which may take several weeks to complete before an application can be submitted. Registered applicants may still be required to update their registration before submitting an application.

Registration in SAM is renewed annually and persons making submissions on behalf of the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) must be authorized in GRANTS.GOV by the AOR to make submissions. (5) Funding Restrictions Funds may be used for post-award expenditures only. Funds under this NOFO cannot be used to reimburse projects for otherwise eligible expenses incurred prior to the date of project award announcements.

(6) Other Submission Requirements FTA encourages applicants to identify scaled funding options in case insufficient funding is available to fund a project at the full requested amount. If an applicant indicates that a project is scalable, the applicant must provide an appropriate minimum funding amount that will fund an eligible project that achieves the objectives of the program and meets all relevant program requirements. The applicant must provide a clear explanation of how a reduced award would affect the project budget and scope.

FTA may award a lesser amount whether or not the applicant provides a scalable option. E. Application Review Information (1) Project Evaluation Criteria Addressing the deteriorating conditions and disproportionately high fatality rates on our rural transportation infrastructure is of critical interest to the Department, as rural transportation networks face unique challenges in safety, infrastructure condition, and passenger and freight usage.

Consistent with the R.O.U.T.E.S. Initiative, the Department will consider how the project will address the challenges faced by rural areas. In addition, the Department will review and consider applications for funding pursuant to this Notice in accordance with the President's September 2, 2020 memorandum, entitled Memorandum on Reviewing Funding to State and Local Government Recipients of Federal Funds that Are Permitting Anarchy, Violence, and Destruction in American Cities, consistent with guidance from the Office of Management and Budget and the Attorney General and with all applicable laws.

FTA will evaluate proposals submitted according to the following criteria. (a) Project Innovation and Impact. (b) Project Approach.

(c) National Applicability. (d) Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer. And (e) Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity.

FTA encourages each applicant to demonstrate how a project supports all criteria with the most relevant information the applicant can provide, regardless of whether such information has been specifically requested or identified in this notice. A. Project Innovation and Impact i.

Effectiveness of the project in achieving and demonstrating the specific objectives of this program. Ii. Demonstration of benefits in addressing the needs of the transit agency and industry and impacts to infrastructure, equipment, transit workforce, and riders.

Iii. Degree of improvement over current and existing technologies, designs, and/or practices applicable to the transit industry. B.

Project Approach i. Quality of the project approach such as existing partnerships, collaboration strategies and level of commitment of the project partners. Ii.

Proposal is realistic in its approach to fulfill the milestones/deliverables, schedule and goals. C. National Applicability i.

Degree to which the project could be replicated by other transit agencies regionally or nationally. Ii. Ability to evaluate technologies, designs and/or practices in a wide variety of conditions and locales.

Iii. Degree to which the technology, designs and/or practices can be replicated by other transportation modes. D.

Commercialization and/or Knowledge Transfer i. Demonstrates a realistic plan for moving the results of the project into the transit marketplace (patents, conferences, articles in trade magazines, webinar, site visits, etc.). Ii.

How the project team plans to work with the industry on improving best practices, guidance and/or standards, if applicable. Iii. Demonstrate a clear understanding and robust approach to data collection, access and management.

E. Technical, Legal and Financial Capacity Capacity of the applicant and any partners to successfully execute the project effort. There should be no outstanding legal, technical, or financial issues with the applicant that would make this a high-risk project.

(2) Review and Selection Process An FTA technical evaluation committee will evaluate proposals based on the published project evaluation criteria. Members of the technical evaluation committee will rate the applications and may seek clarification about any statement in an application. The FTA Administrator will determine the final selection and amount of funding for each project after consideration of the findings of the technical evaluation committee.

Geographic diversity, diversity of the project type, the amount of local match to be provided, and the applicant's receipt and management of other Federal transit funds may be considered in FTA's award decisions. Prior fare payment innovation efforts may receive priority consideration. The FTA Administrator will consider the following key DOT objectives.

A. Utilizing alternative funding sources and innovative financing models to attract non-Federal sources of investment. B.

Whether the project is located in or supports public transportation service in a qualified opportunity zone designated pursuant to 26.U.S.C. 1400Z-1. And c.

The extent to which the project addresses challenges specific to the provision of rural public transportation. (3) FAPIIS Review Prior to making a grant award, FTA is required to review and consider any information about the applicant that is in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS) accessible through SAM. An applicant may review and comment on information about itself that a Federal awarding agency previously entered.

FTA will consider any comments by the applicant, in addition to the other information in FAPIIS, in making a judgment about the applicant's integrity, business ethics, and record of performance under Federal awards when completing the review of risk posed by applicants as described in 2 CFR 200.205 Federal Awarding Agency Review of Risk Posed by Applicants. F. Federal Award Administration Information (1) Federal Award Notices FTA will announce the final project selections on the FTA website.

Project recipients should contact their FTA Regional Office for additional information regarding allocations for Start Printed Page 63657projects. At the time project selections are announced, FTA will extend pre-award authority for the selected projects. There is no blanket pre-award authority for these projects before announcement.

There is no minimum or maximum grant award amount, but FTA intends to fund as many meritorious projects as possible. FTA only will consider proposals from eligible recipients for eligible activities. Due to funding limitations, projects selected for funding may receive less than the amount originally requested.

In those cases, applicants must be able to demonstrate that the proposed projects are still viable and can be completed with the amount awarded. (2) Administrative and National Policy Requirements a. Pre-Award Authority FTA will issue specific guidance to recipients regarding pre-award authority at the time of selection.

FTA does not provide pre-award authority for competitive funds until projects are selected, and there are Federal requirements that must be met before costs are incurred. For more information about FTA's policy on pre-award authority, see the FY 2020 Apportionments Notice published on June 3, 2020, at https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2020-06-03/​pdf/​2020-11946.pdf. b.

Grant Requirements Selected applicants will submit a grant application through FTA's electronic grant management system and adhere to the customary FTA grant requirements for research project (insert Circular name). All competitive grants, regardless of award amount, will be subject to the Congressional notification and release process. FTA emphasizes that third-party procurement applies to all funding awards, as described in FTA Circular 4220.1F, “Third Party Contracting Guidance.” However, FTA may approve applications that include a specifically identified partnering organization(s) (2 CFR 200.302(f)).

When included, the application, budget, and budget narrative should provide a clear understanding of how the selection of these organizations is critical for the project and give sufficient detail about the costs involved. C. Planning FTA encourages applicants to engage the appropriate State Departments of Transportation, Regional Transportation Planning Organizations, or Metropolitan Planning Organizations in areas to be served by the project funds available under this program.

D. Standard Assurances The applicant assures that it will comply with all applicable Federal statutes, regulations, executive orders, FTA circulars, and other Federal administrative requirements in carrying out any project supported by the FTA grant. The applicant acknowledges that it is under a continuing obligation to comply with the terms and conditions of the grant agreement issued for its project with FTA.

The applicant understands that Federal laws, regulations, policies, and administrative practices might be modified from time to time and may affect the implementation of the project. The applicant agrees that the most recent Federal requirements will apply to the project unless FTA issues a written determination otherwise. The applicant must submit the Certifications and Assurances before receiving a grant if it does not have current certifications on file.

E. Free Speech and Religious Liberty In connection with any program or activity conducted with or benefiting from funds awarded under this notice, recipients of funds must comply with all applicable requirements of Federal law, including, without limitation, the Constitution of the United States. Statutory, regulatory, and public policy requirements, including without limitation, those protecting free speech, religious liberty, public welfare, the environment, and prohibiting discrimination.

The conditions of performance, non-discrimination requirements, and other assurances made applicable to the award of funds in accordance with regulations of the Department of Transportation. And applicable Federal financial assistance and contracting principles promulgated by the Office of Management and Budget.

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Start Preamble Centers for what class of drug is lasix Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Notice of meeting. In accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act, the CDC announces the following meeting for the Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee (MSHRAC). This is a what class of drug is lasix virtual meeting.

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Citizens living lasix instructions abroad. Once the Secretary of HHS has declared that circumstances exist justifying an authorization under section 564 of the FD&C Act, FDA may authorize the emergency use of a drug, device, or biological product if the Agency concludes that the statutory criteria are satisfied. Under section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act, FDA is required to publish in the Federal Register a notice of each authorization, and each termination or revocation of an authorization, and an explanation of the reasons for the action. Section 564 of the FD&C Act permits FDA to authorize the introduction into interstate commerce of Start Printed Page 56232a drug, device, or biological product intended for use when the Secretary lasix instructions of HHS has declared that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use.

Products appropriate for emergency use may include products and uses that are not approved, cleared, or licensed under sections 505, 510(k), 512, or 515 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 355, 360(k), 360b, and 360e) or section 351 of the PHS Act (42 U.S.C. 262), or conditionally approved under section 571 of the FD&C lasix instructions Act (21 U.S.C. 360ccc).

FDA may issue an EUA only if, after consultation with the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, the Director of the National Institutes of Health, and the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (to the extent feasible and appropriate given the applicable circumstances), FDA [] concludes. (1) That lasix instructions an agent referred to in a declaration of emergency or threat can cause a serious or life-threatening disease or condition. (2) that, based on the totality of scientific evidence available to FDA, including data from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, if available, it is reasonable to believe that. (A) The product may be effective in diagnosing, treating, or preventing (i) such disease or condition lasix instructions.

Or (ii) a serious or life-threatening disease or condition caused by a product authorized under section 564, approved or cleared under the FD&C Act, or licensed under section 351 of the PHS Act, for diagnosing, treating, or preventing such a disease or condition caused by such an agent. And (B) the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to diagnose, prevent, or treat such disease or condition, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product, taking into consideration the material threat posed by the agent or agents identified in a declaration under section 564(b)(1)(D) of the FD&C Act, if applicable. (3) that there is no adequate, approved, and available alternative to the product lasix instructions for diagnosing, preventing, or treating such disease or condition. (4) in the case of a determination described in section 564(b)(1)(B)(ii), that the request for emergency use is made by the Secretary of Defense.

And (5) that such other criteria as may be prescribed by regulation are satisfied. No other criteria for issuance have been prescribed by regulation under section 564(c)(4) of lasix instructions the FD&C Act. III. The Authorizations The Authorizations follow the February 4, 2020, determination by the Secretary of HHS that there is a public health emergency that has a significant potential to affect national security or the health and security of U.S.

Citizens living abroad and lasix instructions that involves a novel (new) coronavirus. The virus is now named SARS-CoV-2, which causes the illness COVID-19. Notice of the Secretary's determination was provided in the Federal Register on February 7, 2020 (85 FR 7316). On the basis of such determination, the Secretary of HHS declared lasix instructions on March 27, 2020, that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use of drugs and biological products during the COVID-19 pandemic, pursuant to section 564 of the FD&C Act, subject to the terms of any authorization issued under that section.

Notice of the Secretary's declaration was provided in the Federal Register on April 1, 2020 (85 FR 18250). Having concluded that the criteria for issuance of the Authorizations under section 564(c) of the FD&C Act are met, FDA has issued four authorizations for the emergency use of drugs during the COVID-19 pandemic. On March 28, lasix instructions 2020, FDA issued an EUA to BARDA for oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate, subject to the terms of the Authorization. On April 30, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Fresenius Medical Care for multiFiltrate PRO System and multiBic/multiPlus Solutions, subject to the terms of the Authorization.

On May 1, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Gilead Sciences, Inc. For remdesivir, subject to the terms lasix instructions of the Authorization. On May 8, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC for Fresenius Propoven 2% Emulsion, subject to the terms of the Authorization. The Authorizations in their entirety (not including the authorized versions of the fact sheets and other written materials) follow, below section VI Electronic Access, and provide an explanation of the reasons for issuance, as required by section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act.

IV. EUA Criteria for Issuance No Longer Met Under section 564(g)(2) of the FD&C Act, the Secretary of HHS may revoke an EUA if, among other things, the criteria for issuance are no longer met. On June 15, 2020, FDA revoked the EUA for BARDA for oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate because the criteria for issuance were no longer met. Under section 564(c)(2) of the FD&C Act, an EUA may be issued only if FDA concludes that, based on the totality of scientific evidence available to the Secretary, including data from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, if available, it is reasonable to believe that.

(1) The product may be effective in diagnosing, treating, or preventing such disease or condition and (2) the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to diagnose, prevent, or treat such disease or condition, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product. Based on a review of new information and a reevaluation of information available at the time the EUA was issued, FDA now concludes it is no longer reasonable to believe that (1) oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate may be effective in treating COVID-19 for the uses authorized in the EUA, or (2) the known and potential benefits of these products outweigh their known and potential risks for those uses. Accordingly, FDA revokes the EUA for emergency use of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate to treat COVID-19, pursuant to section 564(g)(2) of the FD&C Act. V.

The Revocation Having concluded that the criteria for revocation of the Authorization under section 564(g) of the FD&C Act are met, FDA has revoked the EUA for BARDA's oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate. The revocation in its entirety follows, below section VI. Electronic Access, and provides an explanation of the reasons for revocation, as required by section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act. VI.

Electronic Access An electronic version of this document and the full text of the Authorizations and revocation are available on the internet at https://www.fda.gov/​emergency-preparedness-and-response/​mcm-legal-regulatory-and-policy-framework/​emergency-use-authorization. Start Printed Page 56233 Start Printed Page 56234 Start Printed Page 56235 Start Printed Page 56236 Start Printed Page 56237 Start Printed Page 56238 Start Printed Page 56239 Start Printed Page 56240 Start Printed Page 56241 Start Printed Page 56242 Start Printed Page 56243 Start Printed Page 56244 Start Printed Page 56245 Start Printed Page 56246 Start Printed Page 56247 Start Printed Page 56248 Start Printed Page 56249 Start Printed Page 56250 Start Printed Page 56251 Start Printed Page 56252 Start Printed Page 56253 Start Printed Page 56254 Start Printed Page 56255 Start Printed Page 56256 Start Printed Page 56257 Start Printed Page 56258 Start Printed Page 56259 Start Printed Page 56260 Start Printed Page 56261 Start Printed Page 56262 Start Printed Page 56263 Start Printed Page 56264 Start Signature Dated. September 3, 2020. Lowell J.

Schiller, Principal Associate Commissioner for Policy. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4164-01-P[FR Doc. 2020-20041 Filed 9-10-20. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4164-01-CAlmost one-third of households report difficulty paying their energy bills or adequately heating and cooling their homes.

And more than 20 percent—roughly 25 million households—report reducing or forgoing necessities such as food and medicine to pay an energy bill. African-American families and rural households are more likely than other groups to spend a high percentage of household income on energy. It’s time for states and communities to put policies in place that will improve energy affordability and access and advance energy equity.On the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in remote South Dakota, where many tribal residents live without electricity in their homes, community members are tackling this problem head on. Pine Ridge received its first transmission line in 2018, but the cost of installing lines and meters has been prohibitive for many households, given that more than half the reservation lives below the poverty line.

In the late 1990s, community member and entrepreneur Henry Red Cloud partnered with the Colorado nonprofit Trees, Water &. People, which had foundation funding to install portable solar heating systems in Pine Ridge at no cost to homeowners. As of November 2019, 500 homes had Red Cloud’s off-grid solar furnaces and they have reduced their heating costs by up to 30 percent.In the face of COVID-19, municipalities, corporations and community organizations have stepped up to address inequities in utility services—from free internet access for K-12 and college students, to bans on water and energy shut offs for people unable to pay their bills. Yet many of these protections are set to expire on arbitrary dates even though the need for them will surely continue.

While the imperative to make access to utility services more equitable became more urgent during the pandemic, the real challenge is making them affordable and accessible over the long term. As the nation begins building toward an equitable and lasting recovery, we must ensure everyone’s basic needs for water, energy, and Internet are met, and that investments in infrastructure are advanced with an equity frame. Returning to the way things were is not acceptable.To build healthier communities, we must advance equitable public infrastructure. Learn more about the connection between public infrastructure and health equity..

Start Preamble Food and Drug Administration, Health and Human Services (HHS) order lasix overnight delivery. Notice. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the issuance of four Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) (the Authorizations) for order lasix overnight delivery drugs for use during the COVID-19 pandemic.

FDA issued four Authorizations under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), as requested by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), Fresenius Medical Care, Gilead Sciences, Inc., and Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC. The Authorizations contain, among other things, conditions on the emergency use of the authorized drugs. The Authorizations follow the February 4, 2020, determination by the Secretary of HHS that there is a public health emergency that has a significant potential to affect national security or order lasix overnight delivery the health and security of U.S.

Citizens living abroad and that involves a novel (new) coronavirus. The virus is now named SARS-CoV-2, which causes the illness COVID-19. On the basis of such determination, the Secretary of HHS declared on March 27, 2020, that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use order lasix overnight delivery of drugs and biological products during the COVID-19 pandemic, pursuant to the FD&C Act, subject to the terms of any authorization issued under that section.

FDA is also announcing the subsequent revocation of the Authorization issued to BARDA for oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate. FDA revoked this authorization on June 15, 2020. The Authorizations, and the revocation, which include an explanation of the reasons for issuance or order lasix overnight delivery revocation, are reprinted in this document.

The Authorization for BARDA was effective as of March 28, 2020, and the revocation of this Authorization is effective as of June 15, 2020. The Authorization for Fresenius Medical Care is effective as of April 30, 2020. The Authorization for Gilead Sciences, order lasix overnight delivery Inc.

Is effective as of May 1, 2020. The Authorization for Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC is effective as of May 8, 2020. Submit written requests for single copies of the EUAs to the Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 order lasix overnight delivery New Hampshire Ave., Bldg.

1, Rm. 4338, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your request or include a Fax number to which the Authorizations may be order lasix overnight delivery sent.

See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic access to the Authorizations. Start Further Info Michael Mair, Office of Counterterrorism and Emerging Threats, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 1, Rm order lasix overnight delivery.

4332, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-8510 (this is not a toll free number). End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I. Background Section order lasix overnight delivery 564 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C.

360bbb-3) allows FDA to strengthen the public health protections against biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological agents. Among other things, section 564 of the FD&C Act allows FDA to authorize the use of an unapproved medical product or an unapproved use of an approved medical product order lasix overnight delivery in certain situations. With this EUA authority, FDA can help ensure that medical countermeasures may be used in emergencies to diagnose, treat, or prevent serious or life-threatening diseases or conditions caused by biological, chemical, nuclear, or radiological agents when there are no adequate, approved, and available alternatives.

II. Criteria for EUA Authorization Section 564(b)(1) of the FD&C Act provides that, before an EUA may be issued, order lasix overnight delivery the Secretary of HHS must declare that circumstances exist justifying the authorization based on one of the following grounds. (1) A determination by the Secretary of Homeland Security that there is a domestic emergency, or a significant potential for a domestic emergency, involving a heightened risk of attack with a biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear agent or agents.

(2) a determination by the Secretary of Defense that there is a military emergency, or a significant potential for a military emergency, involving a heightened risk to U.S. Military forces, including personnel operating under the authority of title order lasix overnight delivery 10 or title 50, United States Code, of attack with (i) a biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear agent or agents. Or (ii) an agent or agents that may cause, or are otherwise associated with, an imminently life-threatening and specific risk to U.S.

Military forces; [] (3) a determination by the Secretary of HHS that there is a public health emergency, or a significant potential for a public health emergency, that affects, or has a significant potential to affect, national security or the health and security of U.S. Citizens living abroad, order lasix overnight delivery and that involves a biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear agent or agents, or a disease or condition that may be attributable to such agent or agents. Or (4) the identification of a material threat by the Secretary of Homeland Security pursuant to section 319F-2 of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act (42 U.S.C.

247d-6b) sufficient to affect national security or the health and security of U.S. Citizens living abroad order lasix overnight delivery. Once the Secretary of HHS has declared that circumstances exist justifying an authorization under section 564 of the FD&C Act, FDA may authorize the emergency use of a drug, device, or biological product if the Agency concludes that the statutory criteria are satisfied.

Under section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act, FDA is required to publish in the Federal Register a notice of each authorization, and each termination or revocation of an authorization, and an explanation of the reasons for the action. Section 564 of the FD&C Act permits FDA to authorize the introduction order lasix overnight delivery into interstate commerce of Start Printed Page 56232a drug, device, or biological product intended for use when the Secretary of HHS has declared that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use. Products appropriate for emergency use may include products and uses that are not approved, cleared, or licensed under sections 505, 510(k), 512, or 515 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C.

355, 360(k), 360b, and 360e) or section 351 of the PHS Act (42 U.S.C. 262), or order lasix overnight delivery conditionally approved under section 571 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 360ccc).

FDA may issue an EUA only if, after consultation with the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, the Director of the National Institutes of Health, and the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (to the extent feasible and appropriate given the applicable circumstances), FDA [] concludes. (1) That an agent referred to in a order lasix overnight delivery declaration of emergency or threat can cause a serious or life-threatening disease or condition. (2) that, based on the totality of scientific evidence available to FDA, including data from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, if available, it is reasonable to believe that.

(A) The product may be effective in diagnosing, treating, order lasix overnight delivery or preventing (i) such disease or condition. Or (ii) a serious or life-threatening disease or condition caused by a product authorized under section 564, approved or cleared under the FD&C Act, or licensed under section 351 of the PHS Act, for diagnosing, treating, or preventing such a disease or condition caused by such an agent. And (B) the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to diagnose, prevent, or treat such disease or condition, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product, taking into consideration the material threat posed by the agent or agents identified in a declaration under section 564(b)(1)(D) of the FD&C Act, if applicable.

(3) that there is no adequate, approved, and available alternative to the product for diagnosing, preventing, or treating such disease or order lasix overnight delivery condition. (4) in the case of a determination described in section 564(b)(1)(B)(ii), that the request for emergency use is made by the Secretary of Defense. And (5) that such other criteria as may be prescribed by regulation are satisfied.

No other criteria for issuance have been prescribed by regulation under section 564(c)(4) of the order lasix overnight delivery FD&C Act. III. The Authorizations The Authorizations follow the February 4, 2020, determination by the Secretary of HHS that there is a public health emergency that has a significant potential to affect national security or the health and security of U.S.

Citizens living abroad and order lasix overnight delivery that involves a novel (new) coronavirus. The virus is now named SARS-CoV-2, which causes the illness COVID-19. Notice of the Secretary's determination was provided in the Federal Register on February 7, 2020 (85 FR 7316).

On the basis of such determination, the Secretary of HHS declared on March 27, 2020, that circumstances exist justifying the authorization of emergency use of drugs and biological products during the COVID-19 pandemic, pursuant to order lasix overnight delivery section 564 of the FD&C Act, subject to the terms of any authorization issued under that section. Notice of the Secretary's declaration was provided in the Federal Register on April 1, 2020 (85 FR 18250). Having concluded that the criteria for issuance of the Authorizations under section 564(c) of the FD&C Act are met, FDA has issued four authorizations for the emergency use of drugs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On March 28, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to BARDA for oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine order lasix overnight delivery sulfate, subject to the terms of the Authorization. On April 30, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Fresenius Medical Care for multiFiltrate PRO System and multiBic/multiPlus Solutions, subject to the terms of the Authorization. On May 1, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Gilead Sciences, Inc.

For remdesivir, subject order lasix overnight delivery to the terms of the Authorization. On May 8, 2020, FDA issued an EUA to Fresenius Kabi USA, LLC for Fresenius Propoven 2% Emulsion, subject to the terms of the Authorization. The Authorizations in their entirety (not including the authorized versions of the fact sheets and other written materials) follow, below section VI Electronic Access, and provide an explanation of the reasons for issuance, as required by section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act.

IV. EUA Criteria for Issuance No Longer Met Under section 564(g)(2) of the FD&C Act, the Secretary of HHS may revoke an EUA if, among other things, the criteria for issuance are no longer met. On June 15, 2020, FDA revoked the EUA for BARDA for oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate because the criteria for issuance were no longer met.

Under section 564(c)(2) of the FD&C Act, an EUA may be issued only if FDA concludes that, based on the totality of scientific evidence available to the Secretary, including data from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, if available, it is reasonable to believe that. (1) The product may be effective in diagnosing, treating, or preventing such disease or condition and (2) the known and potential benefits of the product, when used to diagnose, prevent, or treat such disease or condition, outweigh the known and potential risks of the product. Based on a review of new information and a reevaluation of information available at the time the EUA was issued, FDA now concludes it is no longer reasonable to believe that (1) oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate may be effective in treating COVID-19 for the uses authorized in the EUA, or (2) the known and potential benefits of these products outweigh their known and potential risks for those uses.

Accordingly, FDA revokes the EUA for emergency use of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate to treat COVID-19, pursuant to section 564(g)(2) of the FD&C Act. V. The Revocation Having concluded that the criteria for revocation of the Authorization under section 564(g) of the FD&C Act are met, FDA has revoked the EUA for BARDA's oral formulations of chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine sulfate.

The revocation in its entirety follows, below section VI. Electronic Access, and provides an explanation of the reasons for revocation, as required by section 564(h)(1) of the FD&C Act. VI.

Electronic Access An electronic version of this document and the full text of the Authorizations and revocation are available on the internet at https://www.fda.gov/​emergency-preparedness-and-response/​mcm-legal-regulatory-and-policy-framework/​emergency-use-authorization. Start Printed Page 56233 Start Printed Page 56234 Start Printed Page 56235 Start Printed Page 56236 Start Printed Page 56237 Start Printed Page 56238 Start Printed Page 56239 Start Printed Page 56240 Start Printed Page 56241 Start Printed Page 56242 Start Printed Page 56243 Start Printed Page 56244 Start Printed Page 56245 Start Printed Page 56246 Start Printed Page 56247 Start Printed Page 56248 Start Printed Page 56249 Start Printed Page 56250 Start Printed Page 56251 Start Printed Page 56252 Start Printed Page 56253 Start Printed Page 56254 Start Printed Page 56255 Start Printed Page 56256 Start Printed Page 56257 Start Printed Page 56258 Start Printed Page 56259 Start Printed Page 56260 Start Printed Page 56261 Start Printed Page 56262 Start Printed Page 56263 Start Printed Page 56264 Start Signature Dated. September 3, 2020.

Lowell J. Schiller, Principal Associate Commissioner for Policy. End Signature End Supplemental Information BILLING CODE 4164-01-P[FR Doc.

2020-20041 Filed 9-10-20. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4164-01-CAlmost one-third of households report difficulty paying their energy bills or adequately heating and cooling their homes. And more than 20 percent—roughly 25 million households—report reducing or forgoing necessities such as food and medicine to pay an energy bill.

African-American families and rural households are more likely than other groups to spend a high percentage of household income on energy. It’s time for states and communities to put policies in place that will improve energy affordability and access and advance energy equity.On the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in remote South Dakota, where many tribal residents live without electricity in their homes, community members are tackling this problem head on. Pine Ridge received its first transmission line in 2018, but the cost of installing lines and meters has been prohibitive for many households, given that more than half the reservation lives below the poverty line.

In the late 1990s, community member and entrepreneur Henry Red Cloud partnered with the Colorado nonprofit Trees, Water &. People, which had foundation funding to install portable solar heating systems in Pine Ridge at no cost to homeowners. As of November 2019, 500 homes had Red Cloud’s off-grid solar furnaces and they have reduced their heating costs by up to 30 percent.In the face of COVID-19, municipalities, corporations and community organizations have stepped up to address inequities in utility services—from free internet access for K-12 and college students, to bans on water and energy shut offs for people unable to pay their bills.

Yet many of these protections are set to expire on arbitrary dates even though the need for them will surely continue. While the imperative to make access to utility services more equitable became more urgent during the pandemic, the real challenge is making them affordable and accessible over the long term. As the nation begins building toward an equitable and lasting recovery, we must ensure everyone’s basic needs for water, energy, and Internet are met, and that investments in infrastructure are advanced with an equity frame.

Returning to the way things were is not acceptable.To build healthier communities, we must advance equitable public infrastructure. Learn more about the connection between public infrastructure and health equity..